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Easter Sunday

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John 20: 1-18

  • John 20: 1-18 (RCL)
  • John 20: 1-9 (RC)
  • John 20: 1-18 (RCL)
  • John 20: 1-10 (11-18)(EL)

Matthew 28: 1-10

  • Matthew 28: 1-10 (Narrative)

Mark 16: 1-8

  • Mark 16: 1-8 (RCL)(B)
  • Mark 16: 1-8 (Narrative)(2020)

Luke 24: 1-12

  • Luke 24: 1-12 (RCL)
  • Luke 24: 1-12 (RC)(Vigil)
  • Luke 24: 1-12 (RCL)(C)
  • Luke 24: 1-12 (Narrative)(2021)

Luke 24: 13-49

  • Luke 24: 13-49 (RCL)(Evening)

Colossians 3: 1-4

  • Colossians 3: 1-4 (all)

1 Corinthians 5: 6

  • 1 Corinthians 5: 6b-8 (opt. RC & RCL)

1 Corinthians 15: 1-11

  • 1 Corinthians 15: 1-11 (RCL)(B)

1 Corinthians 15: 19-26

  • 1 Corinthians 15: 19-26 (RCL)(C)

Acts 10: 34, 37-43

  • Acts 10: 34, 37-43 (RC)
  • Acts 10: 34-43 (RCL & EL)

Psalm 118: 1-2, 16-17, 22-23

  • Psalm 118: 1-2, 16-17, 22-23 (RC)
  • Psalm 118: 14-29 (EL)
  • Psalm 118: 1-2, 14-24 (RCL)

Isaiah 25: 6-9

  • Isaiah 25: 6-9 (RCL)(B)

Isaiah 51: 9-11

  • Isaiah 51: 9-11 (RCL & EL)

Isaiah 65: 17-25

  • Isaiah 65: 17-25 (RCL)

Jeremiah 31: 1-6

  • Jeremiah 31: 1-6 (RCL)(A & C)

Easter Resources

  • (Scroll down for resources for singing the Exsultet.)
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Commentaries and Lectionary Reflections (RC)(B)(2021)

Commentaries and Lectionary Reflections (RCL)(B)(2021)

Illustrated Resources from the Archives (RC & RCL)

  • A Dead Man Named Jesus

    by Dan Clendenin
    I hadn't planned to see the movie Risen (Sony Pictures). The story is about an agnostic Roman centurion named Clavius who is tasked by Pontius Pilate with debunking the rumors that a crucified criminal named Yeshua had risen from the dead. It sounded like an easy job — after all, Clavius himself had given the order to spear Yeshua in the side as he hung from the cross, so all he had to do was to identify the dead body. But in one important regard I really liked Risen — it helped me to imagine that in real history and in real human lives something like the story about Clavius definitely happened after the death of Jesus. Rumors and denials. Fear and confusion. Doubt and incredulity. That's exactly what we read in the gospels.
  • A Miracle Morning

    by Steve Goodier
    ("In her poem Aurora Leigh, Elizabeth Barrett Browning wrote: 'Earth's crammed with heaven, And every common bush afire with God: But only he who sees, takes off his shoes, The rest sit round it, and pluck blackberries.' Along the early morning path, my friend had removed her shoes. For her, earth was "crammed with heaven" and "every bush afire." It wasn't just perkiness; she had eyes to see what I had completely missed. I was, as Browning might say, sitting around plucking blackberries...")
  • Wonder and the True Easter Lily

    by Jessica Miller
    Across the northeast of North America at this season, a wonder is happening. The flowers of Symplocarpus foetidus have begun emerging and blooming from swamps and wet places. These true Easter-lilies—members of the same family of the Calla ‘lily’—are more commonly known as skunk-cabbage. Varieties of the plant also grow in Japan, where the red robe-like blossoms resembling a monk’s hood have gained it the name Zazen-sou, or Zen meditation plant. They are one of the first plants to bloom, and they do it in such complete faith of spring that they often can be seen in late February, piercing through ice and snow. “See those green cabbage buds lifting the dry leaves in that watery and muddy place?” Henry David Thoreau said, “There is no can’t nor cant to them. They see over the brow of winter’s hill. They see another summer ahead.” Beyond the anthropomorphism, the skunk cabbage is Zen-like in another way—their utterly calm certainty of hope...
  • Easter Sunday (A)

    from Sacra Conversazione
    Walter Brueggemann writes at the conclusion of Biblical Perspectives on Evangelism (pp 129-130): “At base, biblical faith is the assertion that God has overcome all that threatens to cheapen, enslave, or fragment our common life. Because the power of death is so resilient, this triumph of God is endlessly reiterated, reenacted, and replicated in new formats and venues. As a result of that always new victory, we are left to do our most imaginative proclamation and most courageous appropriation.” We have heard the announcement of Mary Magdalene and others; what are we going to do with it; now, what are we going to do about it?
  • Easter Sunday (C)

    from Sacra Conversazione
    In his sweetly provocative essay Noli me tangere!: On the Raising of the Body, Jean-Luc Nancy considers in considerable detail the encounter in John’s narrative between Mary Magdalene and the Risen Christ. In his essay he notes the significance that every major artist in Western art has been captivated by this encounter. His text reproduces many of them and he provides a list at the end of more than fifty of the most notable from art collections around the world. And, of course, he also provides his own unique interpretation of this encounter only in John’s gospel...
  • Pour Out Light Unshadowed

    by Michael Simone, SJ
    The show “Hoarders” profiles individuals whose obsessive fear of loss causes a compulsive accumulation of unneeded things. In every episode, a mental health professional tries to help the individual break this cycle. For many, hoarding started with a catastrophic childhood loss. Memories of that death darken every succeeding event; a lifetime of reinforcement drives them to cling to anything that might protect them from another loss. They only find relief when they overcome their fear.
  • The Evil Underpinning Easter

    by Peter Woods
    Approaching the pivotal Christian feast of Easter with its themes of death and redemption, I am aware of how much violence is a feature of our daily news. Whether it be in domestic and child abuse, street violence, or brutal murder, violence stalks us like a hungry wolf.
  • What Is Easter Without the Eucharist?

    by Terrance Klein
    Does missing Mass on Sunday ever come to feel right? Not according to Noel Crowe. When the events of Niall Williams’s lovely new novel of Irish village life,This Is Happiness, take place, Noel is 17. He narrates them six decades later: When you’ve been raised inside a religion, it’s not a small thing to step outside it. Even if you no longer believe in it, you can feel its absence. There’s a spirit-wound to a Sunday. You can patch it, but it’s there, whether natural or invented not for me to say. Although he had briefly been a seminarian, at age 17 Noel tells his family that he will not be going with them to the Easter Vigil. Still, even for this young unbeliever, there is that “spirit-wound.”...
  • Easter Sunday (A)(2020)

    by Laurel Mathewson
    he choir director at the church where I serve has unusual credentials. She used to lead a large choir in the Nyarugusu refugee camp in Tanzania. She grew up there herself: her extended family fled from violence in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and then spent almost 25 years in Tanzania before resettlement in San Diego in 2016. I met Matrida that fall, when she arrived at St. Luke’s with her two young children and her voice that moves worshipers to tears, whether or not they understand Swahili or Kibembe. Matrida also leads a band, which recently held a Congolese gospel concert at the church on a Saturday night. The next day, a white congregant in his seventies said he couldn’t stop wondering about the concert: What kind of faith gets you through 25 years in a refugee camp singing God’s praises?...
  • Between Friday and Sunday

    by Larry Patten
    I know the end, which means I know the beginning. And yet knowing is only a thin slice of believing. The most athletic of dates, Easter annually leaps from March to April and back again. Easter represents the end: of Jesus’ earthly ministry, of the disciples having a leader in the flesh to follow, of the religious authorities confident they actually wielded authority, of the empire going about its business as the bully that won every argument. There on Friday, after all, Jesus died. In the end, he was dead and buried thanks to the quick assistance of Nicodemus and an Arimathean named Joseph. But it represents a beginning, then and now: Easter dawned a morning like every morning and like no other morning. Easter began, long ago before it was dubbed Easter, with those women tramping in the dark toward nothing and everything. Easter, which for every modern Christian preacher has been clearly marked on the calendar for a year, arrives. Once it seemed far away. And then it was next Sunday...

Commentaries and Lectionary Reflections (RC)(A)(2020)

Commentaries and Lectionary Reflections (RC)(C)(2019)

Commentaries and Lectionary Reflections (RCL)(C)(2019)

Commentaries and Lectionary Reflections (RC)(B)(2018)

Commentaries and Lectionary Reflections (RCL)(A)(2017)

Commentaries and Lectionary Reflections (RCL)(C)(2016)

Commentaries and Lectionary Reflections (RCL)(B)(2015)

(Resources listed here reference more than one reading and are normally shorter than the resources listed under the individual texts above. If you are looking to link the readings, check these resources.)

Commentaries and Lectionary Reflections (RCL)(A)(2014)

(Resources listed here reference more than one reading and are normally shorter than the resources listed under the individual texts above. If you are looking to link the readings, check these resources.)

Commentaries and Lectionary Reflections (RCL)(C)(2013)

(Resources listed here reference more than one reading and are normally shorter than the resources listed under the individual texts above. If you are looking to link the readings, check these resources.)

Commentaries and Lectionary Reflections (RCL)(B)(2012)

(Resources listed here reference more than one reading and are normally shorter than the resources listed under the individual texts above. If you are looking to link the readings, check these resources.)

Commentaries and Lectionary Reflections (RCL)(C)(2010) and (A)(2011)

(Resources listed here reference more than one reading and are normally shorter than the resources listed under the individual texts above. If you are looking to link the readings, check these resources.)

Commentaries and Lectionary Reflections (RCL)(A)(2008) and (B)(2009)

(Resources listed here reference more than one reading and are normally shorter than the resources listed under the individual texts above. If you are looking to link the readings, check these resources.)

Commentaries and Lectionary Reflections (RCL)(B)(2006) and (C)(2007)

(Resources listed here reference more than one reading and are normally shorter than the resources listed under the individual texts above. If you are looking to link the readings, check these resources.)

Commentaries and Lectionary Reflections (RC)(Archives)

(Resources listed here reference more than one reading and are normally shorter than the resources listed under the individual texts above. If you are looking to link two or more of the readings, check these resources.)

Commentaries and Lectionary Reflections (RCL)(Archives)

(Resources listed here reference more than one reading and are normally shorter than the resources listed under the individual texts above. If you are looking to link the readings, check these resources.)

Music Suggestions

Prayers of the People

Worship Resources (B)(2021)

Worship Resources (A)(2020)

Worship Resources (C)(2019)

Worship Resources (B)(2018)

Worship Resources (A)(2017)

Worship Resources (C)(2016)

Worship Resources (B)(2015)

Worship Resources (C)(2013)

Worship Resources (B)(2012)

Worship Resources (A)(2011)

Worship Resources (2008 to 2010)(A to C)

Worship Resources (Archives)

Powerpoint, Images and Clip Art for Worship

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