1 John 3: 1-7

Quick Locator

ReadingsRelated PagesResourcesInformation
Links
177
Categories
8
Last Updated
4¼ hours ago
Last Checked
4¼ hours ago

New Resources

  • Easter 3B (2021)

    by Rhonda Carrim
  • To Be a Child of God

    by Bob Cornwall
  • Exegesis (1 John 3:1-7)

    by Richard Donovan
  • Sorry Saints

    by Jim Eaton
    Here’s the real life story of Anne LaMott. She says: There is a coastal town of about 1,500 people [near San Francisco], where one of my first memories took place, of splashing with my parents and older brother in warm water that had pooled and warmed after the tide had receded. We used to go to the town fairly often for seafood dinners. It was artsy, hidden away, with gulls and pelicans overhead. We would have picnics there with friends and lots of wine, and elderberry hunts in the fall….There are sheltered beaches, tiled in shells and beach glass; and boats and fishermen, shaded lanes and towering trees; and a few overpriced places to eat (“Would you like a croissant? . . . That will be one hundred dollars”). Many of the townspeople go back generations; others came in the sixties…The colors there—of the water, the rushes, the impossibly rich vegetation—drive people to ecstasy and madness. In 1995, there was a huge and devastating fire on the long, majestic ridge that runs for miles out to the bay. Four older teenage boys from the town had camped at Mount Vision overnight, illegally, had built a campfire, buried it under dirt when they left in the morning, and caused a fire that destroyed 12,000 acres of wilderness area and nearly fifty homes.” Helicopters saved the town with water from the bay; the water was dropped on the pine forest between the town and the burning ridge. But the loss of wildlife was unimaginable: birds, deer, coyote, bobcats, mountain lions, beavers. It was as if a bomb had fallen. The four teenage boys who had accidentally started the fire turned themselves in early on, with their parents beside them...
  • Easter 3B (2021)

    by Gary Neal Hansen
  • Easter 3B (2021)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Sermon Starters (Easter 3B)(2021)

    by Scott Hoezee
    In one of his books, Tom Long mentions a friend who serves as a hospital chaplain somewhere. One Ash Wednesday he slipped away from the hospital long enough to attend a mid-day service and so he returned to work a bit alter with a cross-shaped smudge of ash on his forehead. At one point as he entered the room of an older woman who was a patient that day, she immediately grabbed a Kleenex and said, “Come over here, dear, you seem to have gotten into something” and was clearly getting ready to clean up his dirty forehead. “No, no” the chaplain said. “You see, this smudge of ash is from an Ash Wednesday service where I was reminded that I am weak and frail, sinful and vulnerable and that soon enough my own life will return to the dust. But it also reminds me that on his cross, Jesus took all that away and has made me new and alive again.” The old woman thought for a moment and then said “I think I want some of that too.” And so borrowing from his own smudge, the chaplain made the sign of the cross on also her forehead. What we want in preaching is what John wanted in proclaiming the lavish love of the Father for us his children: we want to present the Good News in so lyric and compelling a way that others will want it, too.
  • Easter 3B (2021)

    by Elisabeth Johnson
  • Easter 3B

    by Bill Loader
    always good insights!
  • The Children of God

    by Jim McCrea
    There’s an old story about a kingdom that was invaded by its enemies. The king was killed, but all of his children were rescued by the king’s servants and hidden away. The smallest child was an infant daughter, who was raised by a peasant family. The servants who gave her to that family never told them who she was, so neither the family nor the girl had any idea of her heritage. As far as they were all concerned, she was simply a peasant’s daughter, who dug potatoes and lived in poverty. Then, one day an old woman came out of the forest and approached the princess while she was digging potatoes. The old woman asked her: “Do you know who you are?” And the young woman said, “Yes, I’m the farmer’s daughter and a potato digger.” The old woman said, “No, no, you are the daughter of the king.” The young woman repeated her words incredulously: “I’m the daughter of the king?” And the old woman nodded vigorously, “Yes, that’s who you are!” Then old woman disappeared back into the forest. There was something about the way the old woman spoke that convinced the girl of the truth of what she’d been told. After the old woman left, nothing had really changed in a practical way. The young woman still lived in poverty and still had to dig potatoes, but after that, she dug them differently. From that moment on, she showed by the way she held her shoulders and by the light in her eyes that she knew who she was. She was the daughter of the king...
  • Easter 3B (2021)

    by Samuel D. Zumwalt, STS

Resources from 2018 to 2020

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tab”. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)
  • Easter 3B (2018)

    by Sherri Brown
  • Joshua

    by Frederick Buechner
  • Easter 3B (2018)

    by Rhonda Carrim
  • All My Children

    by Jim Eaton
  • Paraphrase (1 John 3)

    Poem for Worship by Steve Garnaas-Holmes
  • Easter 3B (2018)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Preaching Helps (Easter 3B)(2018)

    by Scott Hoezee
    In one of his books, Tom Long mentions a friend who serves as a hospital chaplain somewhere. One Ash Wednesday he slipped away from the hospital long enough to attend a mid-day service and so he returned to work a bit later with a cross-shaped smudge of ash on his forehead. At one point as he entered the room of an older woman who was a patient that day, she immediately grabbed a Kleenex and said, “Come over here, dear, you seem to have gotten into something” and was clearly getting ready to clean up his dirty forehead. “No, no” the chaplain said. “You see, this smudge of ash is from an Ash Wednesday service where I was reminded that I am weak and frail, sinful and vulnerable and that soon enough my own life will return to the dust. But it also reminds me that on his cross, Jesus took all that away and has made me new and alive again.” The old woman thought for a moment and then said “I think I want some of that too.” And so borrowing from his own smudge, the chaplain made the sign of the cross on also her forehead...
  • All Saints (A)(2020)

    by Alicia Myers
  • All Saints (A)(2020)

    by Cara Shonamon
  • Unmoored

    by Layton E. Williams

Resources from 2014 to 2017

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tab”. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)
  • The Truth Is Love

    by Dan Bollerud
  • All Saints (A)(2017)

    by Kevin Bright
    An enduring memory of mine is the prayer card she had wedged into one of the kitchen cupboards, laminated of course so it could be wiped clean occasionally amid the chaos. It may be familiar to you. Many simply know it as the ‘Kitchen Prayer’. The first part of it goes… Lord of all pots and pans and things Since I’ve not time to be A saint by doing lovely things or Watching late with Thee Or dreaming in the dawn light or Storming Heaven’s gates Make me a saint by getting meals and Washing up the plates...
  • Deception

    by Richard Bryant
  • New Sight

    by Lori A. Cornell
  • Easter 3B (2015)

    by Nijay Gupta
  • Easter 3B (2015)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Easter 3B (2015)

    by David Owen
  • Are You a Victim of Identity Theft?

    Sermon Starter by Leonard Sweet
    Have you ever been the victim of identity theft? It is a growth industry. A recent study found that 15.4 million people in the United States were the victims of identity theft in 2016 and in the past six years identity thieves have stolen over $107 billion from people like you and me.

    What is identity theft? Identity theft is a serious crime. Identity theft happens when someone uses information about you without your permission. They could use your name, address, credit card or bank account numbers, Social Security number, even medical insurance account numbers to do you harm...

  • Children of God?

    by Keith Wagner
    ("In his sermon, A Knock at Midnight, Martin Luther King told this story: 'My brother and I were driving one evening to Chattanooga, Tennessee, from Atlanta. He was driving the car. And for some reason the drivers were very discourteous that night. Many of them didn't dim their lights..." and other illustrations)
  • All Saints (A)(2017)

    by Audrey West
  • All Saints (A)(2014)

    by Audrey West

Resources from 2009 to 2013

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tab”. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)

Resources from the Archives

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tab”. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)

Children's Resources

The Classics