Genesis 25: 19-34

New Resources

Illustrated Resources from the Archives

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  • Jacob and Esau

    by Peter Blackburn
  • Proper 10A (2017)

    by Doug Bratt
    In his marvelous book that remains a good investment for any biblical preacher or teacher, Peculiar Treasures: A Biblical Who’s Who (Harper & Row, 1979) Frederick Beuchner writes, “Luckily for Jacob, God doesn’t love people because of who they are, but because of who he is. It’s on the house is one way of saying it and it’s by grace is another, just as it was by grace that it was Jacob of all people who became not only the father of the twelve tribes of Israel but the many times great grandfather of Jesus of Nazareth, and just as it was by grace that Jesus of Nazareth was born into this world at all.”
  • The Politics of Fraternal Rivalry

    by Richard Davis
    fraternal rivalry is the source of many religious and political conflicts. Such rivalry is a motif of Augustine’s City of God, where the story of Remus and Romulus, another set of twin brothers, is of central significance to the founding of the first “Earthly City” of Rome (City of God, XV.5). Here Augustine distinguishes between the fratricide of Remus and Romulus and that of another set of Biblical brothers, Cain and Abel. Whereas the case of Remus and Romulus is the primordial and archetypal case of the division and conflict within the city of man, Cain and Abel is a justified case of conflict between the City of God and the City of Man.
  • I Want It NOW!

    by Richard Donovan
    I read recently about Christina and Allan of Sanford, Maine. On February 2, 1995, Christina, age 14, and Allen, age 16, became parents. Neither Christina nor Allen have a job. They don't have a car. They have little schooling. Allan tried to return to school but couldn't stay awake after being up all night with the baby. Christina's mother was a teenage mom. She had a tough life. She says: "Christina and Allan don't know what they got themselves into. They thought it was fun and games, but she lost her childhood. It's all gone." Christina finds her life "boring, boring, boring.…" A big day for Allan and Christina is to go to the mall to ride the escalators and to go to the arcade. On one visit, the arcade management wouldn't let Christina in. Allan says: The sign said "Sixteen or parent's permission." So I pointed to her belly and said, "I'm the parent." In June, Christina and Allan turned 15 and 17. There was no cake. There were no presents. "No nothing," says Christina. Recently Christina was worried that she was pregnant again. She had quit taking her pills. She admits that not taking the pills was stupid, but she pointed to the baby and said, "I wanted another one of those."...
  • Sibling Rivalry

    by Bruce Goettsche
  • Proper 10A (2011)

    by Scott Hoezee
    ("From Frederick Buechner's Peculiar Treasures: A Biblical Who's Who: 'Esau was so hungry he could hardly see straight when his younger twin, Jacob, bought his birthright for a bowl of chili. He was off hunting rabbits when Jacob conned their old father, Isaac, into giving him the blessing that should have been Esau's by right of primogeniture...")
  • A Congregation of Esaus

    by Jim McCrea
    ("I was reading an article that talked about the time when the Tennessee Valley Authority was building its many dams on the Tennessee River in the 1930's. To do that, they had to relocate a number of people who were living in the area that would be flooded when the dams were finished...")
  • Treasuring Our Birthright

    by Jim McCrea
    ("In 1857, two prospecting brothers from Pennsylvania discovered gold in Six-Mile Canyon near what was to become Virginia City, Nevada. Unfortunately, both brothers died before they were able to record their claims...")
  • Bowl for Birthright: A Tale of Opposites (Genesis)

    Art and Faith by Lynn Miller
    Hendrick ter Brugghen has painted that moment. In his Caravaggesque style (to oversimplify, that means strong lights and darks) he shows the two brothers in the foreground, a table of food between them. In the background are the two parents, each standing behind their favored child.
  • ...At Least Dad Is on My Side

    Narrative Sermon by Ralph Milton
  • Esau and Jacob: Sibling Rivalry

    Narrative Sermon by Ralph Milton
  • Making a Difference

    by Billy D. Strayhorn
  • Out of the Stew

    by Billy D. Strayhorn

Other Resources from 2017 to 2019

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Other Resources from 2014 to 2016

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Other Resources from 2011 to 2013

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Other Resources from the Archives

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Children's Resources and Dramas

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