Isaiah 1: 10-20

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New Resources

  • Proper 14C (2019)

    by Stan Mast
    It was John Calvin, I think, who called faith “the open mouth of your soul.” God is willing and eager to fill us with the salvation earned by Christ, but if our head is turned away from God and our mouth is closed, we can’t drink it in. We must turn back to God (repentance) and open our soul (faith) in order to receive the free grace and wide mercy offered to us in Christ. I can still see my children in early toddlerhood, refusing to eat, turning their heads away from the oncoming spoon filled with yummy food. Here God speaks to us as to a stubborn child. Come then, let us reason together. Let us talk about this. Use your head. Be reasonable. I have something wonderful for you. But as long as your head is turned away and your mouth is sealed tight, you can’t eat it. Makes sense, doesn’t it?...
  • Proper 14C (2019)

    by Anathea Portier-Young
  • Proper 14C (2019)

    by Melissa Wass
    In verse 10, Isaiah equates Israel with the rulers of Sodom and the people of Gomorrah. In Ezekiel 16:49 the prophet says: “‘Now this was the sin of your sister Sodom: She and her daughters were arrogant, overfed and unconcerned; they did not help the poor and needy.” While we tend to think of the sin of Sodom being sexual, the Old Testament prophets, Isaiah and Ezekiel, equate the sin of Sodom as being neglect of the poor. In this vein, Isaiah opens up with the comparison of Israel and Sodom and Gomorrah. In verse 11, he continues by discrediting their numerous sacrifices. Zebach is the Hebrew term used here means sacrifices or offering. It is worth noting that sacrifices are always offered up to God.[3] V. 13 uses a different Hebrew noun, minchah, which also means offering, but goes further into the idea of giving–it is from a root meaning to apportion.[4] It would appear the prophet is foreshadowing again the need to apportion, to sacrifice, to give up to the poor and needy before giving up worship to God...

Resources from 2016 to 2018

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Resources from 2013 to 2015

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)
  • Proper 14C (2013)

    by Brendan Byrne
  • Proper 26C (2013)

    by Corrine Carvalho
  • Caring for the Vulnerable

    from Faith Element
  • Proper 14C (2013)

    by David Garber, Jr.
  • Sermon

    by Joanna Harader
  • Visions in the Daytime

    by John Holbert
  • Proper 14C (2013)

    by Sara Koenig
  • Sacrifice

    by Jim McCoy
    ("This week is the anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. . At the time of the Nagasaki bombing, Dr. Takashi Nagai was the dean of the University of Nagasaki medical school. Dr. Nagai survived the bombing and one year later published The Bells of Nagasaki, an extraordinary account of both the grotesque destruction caused by the bomb and the amazing response of doctors, nurses and others as they selflessly attended to other victims...")
  • Our Filthy Metaphors

    by Carol Howard Merritt
  • Learn to Do Good

    by Larry Patten
  • Sinners at the Laundromat

    by Susan Sparks
    We have a little cabin in the great northwoods of Wisconsin, and our Sunday routine is to get up, go out for breakfast, and then head to the laundromat to wash our clothes for the week. On that particular Sunday, just as we started loading our laundry, the door opened and a scarily clean-shaven gentleman walked in and said, "A blessed morning to you, brothers and sisters"--a warning sign, if ever there was one. I could see he had a number of brochures in his hand, but I tried my best not to make eye contact. Sure enough, he came to me first. "Sister," he asked in the most earnest of tones, "have you met Jesus?" "I'm sorry; I haven't seen Jesus at the laundromat this morning." The Jesus-man looked at me with an expression akin to what your elementary school teacher might have offered when you spelled "January" with a "G." He then handed me a tract with a picture of Jesus on the front holding a tiny lamb, looking a bit queasy, and said, "You know, Jesus can wash your sins away better than any of these machines." Deciding I had been snarky enough, I nodded, took the tract, and said, "I don't doubt it, brother." And with that, he went to the sinner next to me at the industrial-sized dryer and started his pitch again. Toby, being an ex-prosecutor and knowing when to speak and when not to, stayed silent during my exchange. However, as the Jesus-man moved to the next person, Toby turned to me and mumbled under his breath, "Sinners at the Laundromat--sounds like a sermon to me." And so this sermon was born.
  • Sermon Thoughts

    by John Watson
  • Proper 14C (2013)

    by Wesley White

Resources from the Archives

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)

Children's Resources

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The Classics

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)