Isaiah 50: 4-9

New Resources

  • Word for the Weary

    by James Matthew Price
  • Proper 19B (2021)

    by Juliana Claassens
  • Exegesis (Isaiah 50:4-9)

    by Richard Donovan
  • Proper 19B (2021)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Sermon Starters (Palm Sunday)(B)(2021)

    by Stan Mast
    At the heart of the best-selling Hunger Games trilogy is Katniss Everdeen, the brave teenager whose suffering was voluntary and substitutionary. When the authorities do their annual lottery to pick the young people who will do gladiatorial battle in the annual entertainment spectacle called the Hunger Games, Katniss’ little sister, Pim, is picked. Katniss immediately volunteers to take Pim’s place. She goes to the Games, improbably wins, and becomes the symbol of a rebellion against the evil President who rules Panem. She not only takes her sister’s place, but also stands in the place of her home district and, indeed, all of Panem. She sets her face to go up to the Capital city to suffer and die, in order to save Pim and Panem.
  • Passion Sunday (B)(2021)

    by Lisa Michaels
  • Listening to God

    Art and Faith by Lynn Miller
    One of the ways that artists have shown that voice of God is through a dove, symbolizing the Holy Spirit, whispering into the ear of prophets or gospel writers or, here, David as he writes the psalms. The dove, a soft-feathered creature, is also the symbol of hope and promise in the story of Noah. It was the dove who returned to the ark with an olive twig in its beak. It is also a symbol of peace. That's not exactly the feel of this dove. The giant bird (compare the size of the bird to the width of David's shoulders) is balanced on one foot on David's crown. The other leg and foot are thrown out for balance. The bird's beak appears to be in David's ear, not just directing words toward the ear in hopes that David will hear. The bird is literally speaking into David's ear as he composes the psalms...
  • Passion Sunday (B)

    by Howard Wallace et al

Illustrated Resources from the Archives

  • Ministers, Not Messiahs: Leaving Our Names, Speaking Our Truth/s with Power/s

    by John Auer
    ("What is this week all about? One way to say it is as John Proctor does in this scene from Arthur Miller’s drama about the Salem witch trials, written while Joseph McCarthy and others of us were, and are, in our own ways, rooting out “witches” and “subversives” and whatever other “threats” to our “homeland security” in the early 50's...")
  • The Servant Who Perseveres

    by Benjamin J. Dueholm
    In his autobiography I Never Had it Made, Jackie Robinson describes a “wild and rage-crazed minute” in his first, most traumatic and abusive season as the first black Major League baseball player. Under vicious heckling from the opposing dugout, he thinks, To hell with the image of the patient black freak I was supposed to create. I could throw down my bat, stride over to that Phillies dugout, grab one of those white sons of bitches and smash his teeth in with my despised black fist. Then I could walk away from it all. I’d never become a sports star. But my son could tell his son someday what his daddy could have been if he hadn’t been too much of a man...
  • Palm/Passion Sunday (B)(2018)

    by Scott Hoezee
    When I was in college, we sang a lyrical setting of Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s poem, “Von wunderbaren Maechten still geborgen” (loosely translated as, “By Gracious Powers So Wonderfully Sheltered”). He wrote it just months before the Nazis hanged him for his Christian resistance to their murderous rule. In it Bonhoeffer includes the line, Gott ist mit uns am Abend und am Morgen, (loosely translated, “God is with us night and day”). In doing so, he reflects, among other things, Isaiah’s confidence that “He who vindicates me is near” (9). Yet Bonhoeffer’s “God is with us night and morning” also perhaps deliberately plays on the German military’s slogan, Gott mit uns, (loosely translated, “God with us”)...
  • Palm Sunday (C)(2016)

    by Scott Hoezee
    ("In his book, Searching for Home, Craig Barnes claims that many people today sense the incompleteness of life as it is, but they don't know where to look for anything better. So they keep trying to fill in the holes in their lives by indulging in food, by increasing their consumer spending, by seeking new experiences, by trying a new drug, by changing careers...")
  • Palm/Passion Sunday (B)(2015)

    by Scott Hoezee
    In his book, Searching for Home, Craig Barnes claims that many people today sense the incompleteness of life as it is, but they don’t know where to look for anything better. So they keep trying to fill in the holes in their lives by indulging in food, by increasing their consumer spending, by seeking new experiences, by trying a new drug, by changing careers. But, of course, none of it satisfies for long. At one point Barnes observes that you know people have hit bottom when, instead of longing for a time when suffering will be no more, they plod on in life while never allowing their hopes to rise any higher than the furtive wish, “Maybe tomorrow we will suffer a little less.”...
  • Sermon Starters (Palm Sunday)(C)(2019)

    by Stan Mast
    Last week I mentioned the novel, Purple Hibiscus, which is set in a troubled time in Nigeria. It focuses on a well-to-do family whose sternly Catholic father abuses the family, even as he showers his church and community with benevolent gifts. At one point, JaJa, the teenaged son rebels. He refuses to participate in the Eucharist and he finally rejects the Faith entirely. When the abusive father is found dead in his office, thus freeing the family from his depredations, JaJa’s sister piously says, “God knows best. God moves in mysterious ways.” The embittered JaJa laughs and replies, ‘Of course God does. But have you ever wondered why? Why did he have to murder his own son so we could be saved? Why didn’t he just go ahead and save us?” That will be the response of many unbelievers (and some Christians) to our text’s focus on the active and passive obedience of the Suffering Servant of the Lord.
  • Images of Isaiah

    Compiled by Jenee Woodard

Other Resources from 2020

  • Passion Sunday (A)(2020)

    by Christopher B. Hays
  • Passion Sunday (A)(2020)

    by Rodney Kilgore
  • Passion Sunday (A)(2020)

    by Stan Mast
    At the heart of the best-selling Hunger Games trilogy is Katniss Everdeen, the brave teenager whose suffering was voluntary and substitutionary. When the authorities do their annual lottery to pick the young people who will do gladiatorial battle in the annual entertainment spectacle called the Hunger Games, Katniss’ little sister, Pim, is picked. Katniss immediately volunteers to take Pim’s place. She goes to the Games, improbably wins, and becomes the symbol of a rebellion against the evil President who rules Panem. She not only takes her sister’s place, but also stands in the place of her home district and, indeed, all of Panem. She sets her face to go up to the Capital city to suffer and die, in order to save Pim and Panem.
  • Passion Sunday (ABC)

    by Howard Wallace

Other Resources from 2018 and 2019

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)

Other Resources from 2016 and 2017

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)

Other Resources from 2014 and 2015

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)

Other Resources from 2009 to 2013

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)

Other Resources from the Archives

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)

Children's Resources and Dramas

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)

Currently Unavailable

  • Passion Sunday (A)

    by Scott Hoezee
  • Palm/Passion Sunday

    by Scott Hoezee
    ("The scene is the last day of school before the Christmas holiday. The boys and girls of an elementary school had just finished their Christmas program for the parents and now it was time to go home for the two-week vacation. One set of parents was waiting for Bobby, their Kindergartner who was carrying home a special project--the Christmas gift for Mom and Dad that the kids had been working on for weeks...")
  • Palm Sunday

    by Scott Hoezee
    ["In his book, Searching for Home, Craig Barnes claims that many people today sense the incompleteness of life as it is, but they don't know where to look for anything better. So they keep trying to fill in the holes in their lives by indulging in food, by increasing their consumer spending, by seeking new experiences, by trying a new drug, by changing careers...")