Lamentations 1: 1-6; 3:19-26

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  • It’s a Ghost Town

    by Bob Cornwall
  • Sermon Starters (Proper 22C)(2019)

    by Stan Mast
    I am writing this piece on September 11, the 19th anniversary of the terrorists’ attacks in America, an event that left a nation in mourning. Since then we have other reasons to mourn as a people. We have discovered the sad truth about such events as enunciated by Frank Yamada. “National tragedies threaten to render communities speechless. The collective grief can be overwhelming.” Thank God we have biblical passages like Lamentations 1 to help us give voice to our sorrow. But thank God even more that we have a Savior who has come to bear our griefs and sorrows with us and for us.
  • Proper 22C (2019)

    by Evan McClanahan
  • Glimmers of Hope in the Darkness

    by Jim McCrea
    •A little girl who was being tucked into bed by her father and asked him, “What’s your favorite Bible story, Papa?” He sat down on the edge of the bed and said, “Let me see. The story of the four friends who carried their paralyzed friend to Jesus, lowering him through the roof, is one of my favorites because it reminds me so much of how your Uncle Hans was healed.” The little girl said, “I don’t know that story. Please tell it to me.” So the father began, “Many years ago, Hans and his wife Enid escaped the war in Europe so that he could continue his life of teaching in the seminary. At first, things were difficult because his English wasn’t very good. But he soon became one of the seminary’s most beloved teachers. The students loved him because he was warm and gentle and when he spoke, the scriptures came alive. “Hans and Enid were very much in love. Nearly every day they took long walks together, holding hands. It warmed the hearts of students and faculty alike to see them sitting close to each other in church. “Then one day, Enid died. Hans was stricken with sorrow. For weeks he wouldn’t eat or take walks. The seminary president, along with three other friends, visited him regularly, but Hans felt lonely and depressed. “On one of their visits, Hans said to his friends, ‘I’m no longer able to pray to God. In fact, I’m not certain I still believe in God.’...
  • Proper 22C (2019)

    by Lisa Michaels
  • The Course of Empire

    Art and Faith by Lynn Miller
    Nineteenth-century American landscape painter Thomas Cole created a series of five paintings he called "The Course of Empire." For Cole, civilization seemed to be a cycle (an inevitable cycle?) of appearing, maturing...and collapsing. The artist chose a line from Byron's "Childe Harold's Pilgrimage" as the motto for the series: There is the moral of all human tales; 'Tis but the same rehearsal of the past, First Freedom, and then Glory -- when that fails, Wealth, vice, corruption, -- barbarism at last.
  • Proper 22C (2019)

    by Brent Peterson
  • Proper 22C (2019)

    by Anathea Portier-Young
  • Proper 12A (2020)

    by Nathan Williams

Resources from 2016 to 2018

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Resources from 2013 to 2015

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Resources from the Archives

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Children's Resources

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The Classics

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