Psalm 130: 1-8

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New Resources

  • Exegesis (Psalm 130)

    by Richard Donovan
  • Proper 5B (2021)

    by Brad Everett
  • Proper 5B (2021)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Sermon Starters (Proper 5B)(2021)

    by Scott Hoezee
    I have watched The Shawshank Redemption so often—all of it or parts of it when I run across it on cable—that there are few subjects in life that I cannot link to some scene or another in the film! And so also for Psalm 130. In the scene you can view here, Andy has made a fateful decision: this was to be the night of his long-planned escape from Shawshank Prison. But Andy’s friend, Red (Morgan Freeman) fears that Andy is in despair and is going to hang himself in his cell. Red’s description of his long night of deep worry when time “draws out like a blade” matches the mood of being in the depths a la Psalm 130 as well as a deep, deep longing for the morning light to come.
  • Proper 14B (2021)

    by Michael Jackson
  • Proper 8B (2021)

    by Mike Palmer
  • Proper 5B (2021)

    by Mark Throntveit
  • Proper 14B

    by Howard Wallace
  • Proper 8B

    by Howard Wallace
  • Waiting for God

    by Garth Wehrfritz-Hanson
    In addition to Psalm 130 being identified as a penitential psalm and a song of ascents or pilgrimage psalm; the Lutheran Study Bible (p. 849) also identifies it as a prayer for help or lament. To understand this psalm as a penitential, pilgrimage and lament psalm, I think it is helpful to consider the insights of biblical scholar, the Rev. Dr. Walter Brueggemann. In two of his books, The Message of the Psalms: A Theological Commentary, and Spirituality of the Psalms, Dr. Brueggemann suggests that patterns of thought and speech in the psalms are similar to the patterns of human life. For example, there are satisfied seasons of well-being, there are anguished seasons of hurt, alienation, suffering and death, and those seasons can become turns of surprise when we are overwhelmed with the new gifts of God. He also puts it another way, summarizing it in three words, stages, or seasons. There are times of orientation when all seems well with the world. There are times of disorientation when the world is turned upside-down and trouble and suffering are the order of the day. Then there are times of reorientation when life is restored, sometimes even better than in a time of orientation. Reorientation can come sometimes in unpredictable, creative and surprising ways...

Resources from 2020

  • Lent 5A (2020)

    by Nancy deClaissé-Walford
  • Out of the Depths

    by Kathy Donley
  • Lent 5A (2020)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Sermon Starters (Lent 5A)(2020)

    by Scott Hoezee
    I have watched The Shawshank Redemption so often—all of it or parts of it when I run across it on cable—that there are few subjects in life that I cannot link to some scene or another in the film! And so also for Psalm 130. In the scene you can view here, Andy has made a fateful decision: this was to be the night of his long-planned escape from Shawshank Prison. But Andy’s friend, Red (Morgan Freeman) fears that Andy is in despair and is going to hang himself in his cell. Red’s description of his long night of deep worry when time “draws out like a blade” matches the mood of being in the depths a la Psalm 130 as well as a deep, deep longing for the morning light to come.
  • Taken Out of the Depths

    by Timothy Hoyer
  • The Lord Hears Us

    by Kelley Land

Resources from 2018 and 2019

  • Time of Redemption

    by Bob Cornwall
  • Proper 5B (2018)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Preaching Helps (Proper 14B)(2018)

    by Scott Hoezee
    While I was a seminary intern, I experienced for the first time what it is like as a pastor to walk with someone through cancer, the rigors of chemotherapy, and the final succumbing to the disease. Especially as the end drew near, what worried this dear Christian man more than anything was what was going to happen on judgment day. He had in his mind an image with which perhaps many of us grew up: the image of some giant movie screen on which God would play the film of our lives including all those greasy moments of secret sin. And my dying friend fretted terribly about this, and maybe some of us do, too. How could we endure the shame of having the whole human race see us literally with our pants down or with our mouths full of swear words or with our hearts filled with dark thoughts of envy, anger, pride, and lust? Worse, how could God ever welcome us into his kingdom given all the sins that would be projected onto that movie screen of judgment? If you, O Lord God, kept a record of sins; if you, O God, fixed your eyes ever and only on what we’ve done wrong, who could stand? The answer is no one. So instead of that grim movie screen of judgment, God long ago fixed his eyes on the cross of his Son and our Savior, Jesus. When we admit our need for the forgiving grace that streams from the cross like a mighty river of mercy, we discover that with God there is forgiveness, and that is the end of the story.
  • Preaching Helps (Proper 8B)(2018)

    by Stan Mast
    Anyone who has ever worked an overnight or “graveyard” shift knows the poignancy of the psalmist’s “wait” (5-6). As the night stretches out what sometimes feels interminably, various “watchmen” will do almost anything to keep themselves awake. Especially if there’s not a lot of work to do besides keep an eye on things, watchmen figuratively if not literally eagerly watch the clock or scan the skies for signs that the morning is dawning and their shift is ending.
  • Proper 14B (2018)

    by Brent Neely
  • Proper 8B (2018)

    by Michael Palmer
  • From the Deeps

    by Leslie Scoopmire

Resources from 2015 to 2017

Resources from 2012 to 2014

  • Hope in the Darkness

    Video with Nikki Hardeman
  • From the Depths

    by Joanna Harader
    If you visit the site of the Dachau camp today, you will see the gate with the infamous, false motto. And you will see the barracks, where prisoners slept crowded together on hard bunks. And you will see the courtyard where people were shot often and for no reason. And you will see the buildings where medical experiments were conducted on human beings, crippling and often killing them. You will see the crematorium. If you visit Dachau today, you will also see a memorial chapel. And if you enter the chapel, you can read these words: Out of the depths I cry to you, O LORD
  • Lent 5A (2014)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Lent 5A (2014)

    by Elizabeth Webb
  • Lent 5A (2014)

    by Wesley White

Resources from the Archives

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