Psalm 15

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  • Exegesis (Psalm 15)

    by Richard Donovan
  • Sermon Starters (Proper 17B)(2021)

    by Scott Hoezee
    Years ago on the TV sitcom “Happy Days” the character of Fonzie tries to get a loan to start up his own business and so a banker visits him in the Cunningham living room. At one point the banker asks him what his collateral is to support getting a loan and when Fonzie says he doesn’t know what that means, the banker gives him a long list of property, bank accounts, and so on that could serve as collateral. “If I had all of that to begin with,” Fonzie retorts, “I wouldn’t need a loan!” Maybe this is a bit of a stretch but something in that reminds me of Psalm 15. We get a long list of moral capital that we are supposed to embody. But suppose you were a kind of seeker wondering how you could be saved and someone gave you the list from Psalm 15. Surely an honest response would be, “If I could become all of that to begin with, I would not need to be saved!” And that’s true. That is why our only hope of being a Psalm 15 person is to become one with Christ and let his benefits accrue to us even as the grace of his sanctifying Holy Spirit transforms us ever more into the image of Jesus himself.
  • Proper 17B (2021)

    by Esther M. Menn
  • On Faithfulness

    by Garth Wehrfritz-Hanson
    On Friday, March 29, 1984, Robert Cunningham ate a meal of linguine and clam sauce at his favourite restaurant, Sal’s pizzeria, where he had been a regular customer for seven years. His waitress, Phyllis Penza, had worked at Sal’s for nineteen years. After his meal Cunningham made a good-natured offer to Penza. He said she could either have a tip or split his winnings if his number was drawn in the upcoming New York lotto. Penza chose to take a chance on the lottery and she and Cunningham chose the numbers together. On Saturday night, Cunningham won. The jackpot was six million dollars. Then he faced the moment of truth. Would he keep his promise? Would he give the waitress a “tip” of three million dollars? Cunningham, a police sergeant, husband, father of four and grandfather of three, said, “I won’t back out. Besides, friendship means more than money.”...

Resources from 2015 to 2020

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)
  • Proper 17B (2018)

    by Wanda Copeland
  • Proper 11C (2019)

    by Jerome Creach
  • Epiphany 4A (2017)

    by Nancy deClaisse-Walford
  • Epiphany 4A (2020)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Proper 11C (2019)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Proper 17B (2018)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Epiphany 4A (2017)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Proper 11C (2016)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Sermon Starters (Epiphany 4A)(2020)

    by Scott Hoezee
    It can be exhausting to live a duplicitous life or to keep track of your own lies. A clear example of this came at the courtroom climax of the film A Few Good Men. The hard-bitten Colonel Jessup (Jack Nicholson) is in charge of a Marine platoon in Guantanamo Bay. One day he secretly ordered a that a troublesome Marine private named Santiago be given a “Code Red,” which was when fellow soldiers would rough up a given individual to motivate him to straighten up and fly right in the future. But the Code Red went south and the private died. To cover up the incident, Col. Jessup tells the lie that he had actually arranged to have the private transferred so as to prevent him from being harmed by fellow soldiers who did not like him—Santiago was slated to move out the very morning after he ended up dying. But Col. Jessup also told the lie that he had given all of his troops strict orders not to touch the private. But when the prosecuting attorney (Tom Cruise) puts 2 & 2 together, he saw a disconnect he could exploit...
  • Sermon Starters (Proper 11C)(2019)

    by Scott Hoezee
    Frederick Buechner once helped to explain the theological meaning of “justification” by referring us back to the literal meaning of that word when it comes to printed documents. On our computers today we can “right justify” or “left justify” or “full justify” any document. Mostly we opt for left justification which means that unless you purposely indent a line to start a new paragraph, the first word of every line in the document will begin at the same place—in the same column—such that they all line up. “Justification” for those lines mean that they stand in a right relationship with the straight edge of the paper itself. The paper is a straight vertical line along its edges. For words and lines to be “justified” with that, they line up, they are as straight as the paper’s edge itself. They are in a right relationship with the page. (And if you do “Full Justification,” then both the left and the right columns do this with the left and the right straight edges of the paper on which the document is printed.)...
  • Epiphany 4A (2020)

    by James Howell
  • Proper 11C (2016)

    by J. Clinton McCann
  • Proper 17B (2018)

    by Esther Menn
  • Epiphany 4A (2020)

    by Danny Quanstrom

Resources from the Archives

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)

Children's Resources

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)

The Classics

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)