Psalm 34

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  • Exegesis (Psalm 34)

    by Richard Donovan
  • Proper 16B (2021)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Sermon Starters (Proper 15B)(2021)

    by Scott Hoezee
    Eugene Peterson’s paraphrase of Romans 12:1-2 nicely captures some of what the middle part of Psalm 34 is also trying to say: So here’s what I want you to do, God helping you: Take your everyday, ordinary life—your sleeping, eating, going-to-work, and walking-around life—and place it before God as an offering. Embracing what God does for you is the best thing you can do for him. Don’t become so well-adjusted to your culture that you fit into it without even thinking. Instead, fix your attention on God. You’ll be changed from the inside out. Readily recognize what he wants from you, and quickly respond to it. Unlike the culture around you, always dragging you down to its level of immaturity, God brings the best out of you, develops well-formed maturity in you.
  • Sermon Starters (Proper 16B)(2021)

    by Scott Hoezee
    Although the final scene of the last episode of the TV series The Sopranos remains a bit of a mystery, most viewers concluded that the meaning of the last and sudden appearance of a completely black, blank, and silent screen indicated that the show’s anti-hero, Tony Soprano, had gotten shot through the head and died. Over the years of the series viewers were simultaneously drawn to Tony and repulsed by him. But in the end Tony was a violent man whose violence led to his own demise. Evil will slay the wicked. The wicked self-destruct. So if Tony did indeed die a violent death at the end of the show—and in front of his whole family at that—well, then there is a sense in which one could say “What do you expect? You cannot spend your life murdering people and forever seeking vengeance and not expect it to come back to bite you eventually.” What Tony did unto others, others finally did unto him. What you sow, you reap...
  • Proper 15B (2021)

    by James K. Mead
  • Proper 16B (2021)

    by James K. Mead
  • Proper 16B (2021)

    by Kelvin St. John
  • Revere God, Don't Tell Lies and Enjoy Life

    by Garth Wehrfritz-Hanson
    A man went to his rabbi with a question. “Rabbi,” he said, “I understand almost all of the law. I understand the commandment not to kill. I understand the commandment not to steal. What I don’t understand is why there is a commandment against slandering the neighbour.” The rabbi looked at the man and said, “I will give you an answer, but first I have a task for you. I would like you to gather a sack of feathers and place a single feather on the doorstep of each house in the village. When you have finished, return for your answer.” The man did as was told and soon returned to the rabbi to announce that the task was complete. “Now, Rabbi, give me the answer to my question. Why is it wrong to slander my neighbour?” “Ah,” the rabbi said. “One more thing. I want you to go back and collect all the feathers before I give you the answer.” “But Rabbi,” the man protested, “the feathers will be impossible to collect. The wind will have blown them away.” “So it is with the lies we tell about our neighbours,” the rabbi said. “They can never be retrieved. They are like feathers in the wind.”...

Resources from 2018 to 2020

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tab”. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)
  • Praise God

    by Craig Condon
  • All Saints (A)(2020)

    by Nancy deClaissé-Walford
  • All Saints (A)(2020)

    by J. R. Forasteros
  • Proper 16B (2018)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Proper 15B (2018)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Proper 15B (2018)

    by Eric Mathis
  • Proper 16B (2018)

    by James Mead
  • Proper 25B (2018)

    by James Runcorn
  • Using the Tongue Well

    by Marshall St. John
  • Preaching Helps (Proper 25B)(2018)

    by Leonard Vander Zee
    One of the ways to understand the Psalm’s call to “taste and see that the Lord is good is to discover it in our actual experience. In “Mere Christianity” C. S. Lewis says that one of the ways to begin to follow Jesus in the Christian life is to begin to live as though you were a Christian. The chapter called “Let’s Pretend” suggests that whenever we say the first words of the Lord’s Prayer, “Our Father,” we are, in fact, pretending to be God’s sons and daughters. “To put it bluntly, we are dressing up as Christ. If you like, you are pretending…. You are not the Son of God whose will and interests are at one with those of the Father: you are a bundle of self-centered fears, hopes, greed, jealousies, and self-conceit, all doomed to death.” Why? “What’s the good of pretending to be what you are not? Lewis continues, “When you are not feeling particularly friendly but know you ought to be, the best thing can do, very often, is to put on a friendly manner and behave as if you were a nicer person than you actually are. And, in a few minutes, as we have all noticed, you will be really feeling friendlier than you were. Very often the only way to get a quality into reality is to start behaving as if you had it already.” In this way, we “taste and see that the Lord is good."

Resources from 2012 to 2017

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Resources from the Archives

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tab”. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)

Children's Resources

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The Classics

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tab”. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)