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Holy Family (B)

Commentaries and Lectionary Reflections (RCL)(2020)

  • Ox and Ass Before Him Bow

    by Dan Clendenin
    In his book A Public Faith (2011), the Yale theologian Miroslav Volf tells how the Canadian philosopher Charles Taylor once heard Mother Theresa explain why she served the poor. She often complained, "people say we're social workers. We're not social workers! We're Christians who worship Jesus as Lord and therefore serve people made in the image of God." Taylor, a practicing Catholic, thought to himself: "I could have said that, too!" Upon further reflection, he then wondered, "But could I have meant it?" (emphasis his). At Christmas we confess a creed, but with Taylor, I ask myself, "do I mean it?"...
  • Christmas 1B

    by Bob Eldan
  • Christmas 1B

    from Faith Futures
  • Christmas 1B (2020)

    by Peggy Hoppes
  • Christmas 1B (2020)

    by James Howell
  • Simeon and Anna

    Lectionary Podcast with Rolf Jacobson, Craig Koester and Kathryn Schifferdecker
  • Lectionary Podcast (Christmas 1B)(2020)

    with Rolf Jacobson, Karoline Lewis, Joy J. Moore and Matt Skinner
  • Reaffirm, Redeem, Rename

    by Cheryl Lindsay
  • Bible Study (Christmas 1B)

    by Robert Linthicum
  • Pulpit Fiction (Christmas 1B)(2020)

    Podcast with Robb McCoy and Eric Fistler
  • Start Acting Like A Child

    Podcast with Taylor Mertins and Teer Hardy
  • Sermon Options (Christmas 1B)

    from Ministry Matters
  • Christmas 1B (2020)

    by Paul Nuechterlein
  • Christmas 1B (2020)

    by Katya Ouchakof
  • Christmas/Epiphany (ABC)

    from Preaching the Revised Common Lectionary
  • Holy Family (B)

    from Proclamation
  • Christmas 1 (ABC)

    from Sacra Conversazione
    A Word that breathes distinctly Has not the power to die Cohesive as the Spirit It may expire if He– “Made flesh and dwelt among us” Could condescension be Like this consent of Language (This loved Philology, second stanza, from “A Word Made Flesh is Seldom,” by Emily Dickinson) We celebrate this day because “the Word became flesh,” and the human words he will speak to us over the course of his lifetime will initiate a new round of interpretation, which continues with us. Every legitimate interpretation will be tested by one criterion: does it produce more “grace and truth?”
  • Christmas Praise in a Mutilated World

    by Joel Shuman
    This disconnect, between the world of the lectionary and the world we currently inhabit, may be why as I thought about these verses I found them tumbling around in my mind with the refrain of the Polish poet Adam Zagajewski’s “Try to Praise the Mutilated World.” Zagajewski was born in the weeks following the end of World War II in Europe, and while he was still an infant his family was forcibly relocated further west when the region where they lived was commandeered and made part of the Ukraine by the Soviet Union. He grew up in difficult times, and while much of his early poetry was activist, protesting the oppressive communist regime of that day, his later work broadened in scope, locating ephemeral glimpses of beauty and joy in the midst of difficulty and tragedy. “Try to Praise the Mutilated World” was written in the days following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and published in the September 24 issue of The New Yorker. The poem’s power comes from the juxtaposition of its refrain, “praise the mutilated world,” with frank acknowledgments of difficult realities and recollected sublimities. With each repetition, the refrain shifts subtly: It appears first as encouragement – “Try to praise the mutilated world”; then as admonition – “You must praise the mutilated world”; then as encouragement – “You should praise the mutilated world”; and finally, as a straightforward call, not entirely unlike the first line of this week’s Psalm – “Praise the mutilated world.”...
  • Right Relationship

    by Anna Sutterisch
  • Divorced, Together

    by Nick Utphall
  • Christmas 1B

    by John van de Laar

Commentaries and Lectionary Reflections (RC)(2017 to 2019)

Commentaries and Lectionary Reflections (RCL)(2017 to 2019)

Commentaries and Lectionary Reflections (RCL)(2014 to 2016)

(Resources listed here reference more than one reading and are normally shorter than the resources listed under the individual texts above. If you are looking to link the readings, check these resources.)

Commentaries and Lectionary Reflections (RCL)(2011 to 2013)

Commentaries and Lectionary Reflections (RC)(Archives)

(Resources listed here reference more than one reading and are normally shorter than the resources listed under the individual texts above. If you are looking to link the readings, check these resources.)

Music Suggestions

Worship Resources (2020)

Worship Resources (2017 to 2019)

Powerpoint, Images and Clip Art for Worship

Currently Unavailable