Mark 16: 15-20

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  • Busting Ghosting

    by Jim Chern
    A guy and a girl go out on a bunch of dates. Things seem to be going along well – similar interests, lots in common, they get to a place where it’s a given that one date ends with plans for another one… Then after one of these dates, the boyfriend or girlfriend reaches out to the other to confirm that date with a simple text “are we still on for tomorrow?” receiving no response. They try again “hey did my message go through?” nothing. They actually call and it goes right to voicemail. The person goes from fearing that something might have happened to the other person that’s made them so unresponsive to fearing that they’ve been “ghosted.” While the phenomenon of someone abruptly ending communication without a goodbye, explanation, or an opportunity of giving “closure” isn’t new – it does seem to have become far too frequent an occurrence for people with The NY Times, The Washington Post doing lengthy pieces on this behavior. “Ghosting” isn’t simply limited to romantic relationships either. In The Guardian, (a British newspaper) they recounted a story of a woman who had a friend for 25 years – whose children were of similar ages which was another way that they had more in common and helped them bond who suddenly was “ghosted” by her friend after she had experienced a death in her family that this friend was unable to deal with. It left her feeling humiliated and depressed...
  • Exegesis (Mark 16:15-20)

    by Richard Donovan
  • A Legacy of Love

    by Sil Galvan
    As a young man, Al was a skilled artist, a potter. He had a wife and two fine sons. One night, his oldest son developed a severe stomach ache. Thinking it was only some common intestinal disorder, neither Al nor his wife took the condition very seriously. But the malady was actually acute appendicitis, and the boy died suddenly that night. Knowing the death could have been prevented if he had only realized the seriousness of the situation, Al's emotional health deteriorated under the enormous burden of his guilt. To make matters worse, his wife left him a short time later, leaving him alone with his six-year-old younger son. The hurt and pain of the two situations were more that Al could handle, and he turned to alcohol to help him cope. In time, Al became an alcoholic. As the alcoholism progressed, Al began to lose everything he possessed - his home, his land, his art objects, everything. Eventually, Al died alone in a San Francisco motel room. When I heard of his death, I reacted with the same disdain that the world shows for one who ends his life with nothing material to show for it. "What a complete failure!" I thought. "What a totally wasted life!" As time went by, I began to re-evaluate my earlier harsh judgment. You see, I knew Al's now adult son, Ernie...
  • What Do Winnie the Pooh and Christ’s Ascension Have in Common? They Teach Us about Imagination.

    by Terrance Klein
    What’s good about goodbyes? When we say farewell to those who have meant so much to us, we close up a world like a book. The final chapter of Winnie the Pooh begins: Christopher Robin was going away. Nobody knew why he was going; nobody knew where he was going; indeed, nobody even knew why he knew that Christopher Robin was going away. But somehow or other everybody in the Forest felt that it was happening at last. Stories, like our lives, must have endings. If we have loved them, we are terribly sad to see them come to an end, but it would not be a proper story, or a proper life, if it did not conclude. In this story, Christopher Robin’s mind is beginning to fill with things that do not belong in the forest with Pooh, Rabbit and Eeyore:...
  • Traveling Mercies

    by Eleonore Stump

Resources from 2015 to 2020

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)
  • Ascension (B)(2015)

    by Edward Mazich, OSB
  • A Spirituality of the Ascension

    by Ron Rolheiser, OMI
    That’s why Jesus, when bidding farewell to his friends before his ascension, spoke these words: “It’s better for you that I go away.” “You will be sad now, but your sadness will turn to joy.” “Don’t cling to me, go instead to Galilee and I will meet you there.” How might we understand these words? How is it better that someone we love goes away? How can the sadness of a goodbye, of a painful leaving, turn to joy? This is something that’s hard to explain, though we experience it daily in our lives. Allow me an example: When I was 22, in the space of four months, my father and mother died, both still young. For myself and my siblings, the pain of their deaths was searing...
  • Ask in My Name

    by Eleonore Stump

Resources from the Archives

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)

The Classics

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)

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