1 Peter 1: 3-9

New Resources

Resources from 2017 to 2019

  • A Special Army of Piety

    by Dan Clendenin
  • Easter 2A (2017)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Easter 2A (2017)

    by Scott Hoezee
    In one of the Narnia stories, The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, Lucy finds herself in a spooky old house. She is a bit afraid but is exploring her surroundings nonetheless. At one point she finds a very old book. She opens it and finds one page that was blank except for some words at the top under the heading of “A spell to make invisible things visible.” She was not so sure she ought to try it but she does. Moments later she can hear someone coming up behind her and she turns around only to see her beloved Lion, Aslan, coming up behind her. “Oh, Aslan, it was kind of you to come” Lucy says. But Aslan had not come from anywhere. “I have been here all the time but you have made me visible” Aslan assures her...
  • Easter 2A (2017)

    by Elisabeth Johnson
  • Rejoice in Difficulties

    from Ministry Matters
    Scroll down the page for this resource.
  • A Blessed Outcome

    by Glenn Monson
  • Easter 2A (2017)

    from Prison Ministry
  • Easter 2A (2017)

    by William Shiell
  • Easter 2A (2017)

    by Ayanna Johnson Watkins
    In the film Boycott, about the 1955 Montgomery bus boycott, there’s a scene in which Martin Luther King Jr. and local civil rights leader E. D. Nixon are standing outside Nixon’s house as it burns to the ground. Nixon knows that white supremacists are behind the arson, but he also seems to know that they will go unpunished. Adding fuel to the fire, the fire department has arrived at the burning house, but the white firefighters elect simply to lean against their trucks and look on while it burns. King arrives and stands beside Nixon, both of them helpless as the house goes up in flames. Nixon asks King how he can stick to his nonviolent principles—or if he even should—as he and his family are physically threatened and attacked by the powers opposing them. King doesn’t answer him directly. Instead, speaking slowly as though it pains him to do so, he quotes from the letter to the Hebrews, chapter 10, verse 39: “But we do not belong to those who shrink back and are destroyed, but to those who have faith and are saved” (NIV).

Resources from 2014 to 2016

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tab”. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)

Resources from 2011 to 2013

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tab”. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)
  • Easter 2A (2011)

    by Daniel Deffinbaugh
  • For Those Who Will Believe

    by Rob Elder
    I think it’s interesting that Karl Barth, one of the greatest theologians of the twentieth century, thought a great deal of the passage we are sharing today. Throughout his long life as a pastor and professor of systematic theology, he labored continuously on a multi-volume work called Church Dogmatics, which takes up about 2 feet of space on my bookshelf at home. In the very last volume of that faithful, immense life’s work of thousands and thousands of pages – a volume called a “fragment” because it ended abruptly, unfinished, when he died – Dr. Barth took up I Peter 1 for the last time in the final few pages. Here is a portion of what he wrote: “According to I Peter 1:3 Christians ... are those who through the overflowing mercy of God ... are in his resurrection from the dead, begotten to a new and living hope... “... The object and content of this hope is the same Jesus Christ who in his resurrection from the dead is its basis ... [This hope] protects them against disenchantment by constantly and clearly differentiating itself from all else that [people] might wait and hope for, all their great little utopias.”...
  • Easter 2A (2011)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Easter 2A (2011)

    by Bryan Jackson
  • Crossing the Threshold

    by Nathan Nettleton
  • Easter 2A (2011)

    by Wesley White
  • Seeing Jesus

    by Lois Wolff
    I’m currently reading a book by Frank Schaeffer, who was a fundamentalist evangelist but who has grown into what I’m calling “Christian skepticism." The title of the book is Patience with God: Faith for People Who Don’t Like Religion {or Atheism}. In the prologue to this book Schaeffer writes This is a book for those of us who have faith in God the same way we might have the flu, less a choice than a state of being in spite of doubt… this book is for those of us who are stuck feeling that there is more to life than meets the eye… If an angel showed up outside my office window and explained “everything” to me, I’d simultaneously question my sanity, be scared as hell, and feel mightily relieved, because believing in invisible things is tough...

Resources from the Archives