Romans 5: 12-21

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  • Sermon Starters (Lent 1A)(2020)

    by Doug Bratt
    The man who hacked to death Hutu Iphigenia’s husband and five of her children was a Tutu named Jean-Bosco. Today, however, Iphigenia works together with Jean-Bosco’s wife Epiphania to make beautiful baskets. She also shares her family meals with the killer she knew and his wife. Jean-Bosco spent seven years in jail for his part in Iphigenia’s family’s massacre. However, while on trial he confessed to the slaughter and asked Iphigenia and others to forgive him. Iphigenia admits that it wasn’t easy to forgive her family’s murderer. In fact, she didn’t speak to Jean-Bosco and his wife for four years. So how did she manage to finally forgive them? Iphigenia told CNN.com, “I am a Christian, and I pray a lot.”..
  • Abundant Grace

    by Bob Cornwall
  • Nature or Nurture?

    by Bob Cornwall
  • Exegesis (Romans 5:12-19)

    by Richard Donovan
  • Lent 1A (2020)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Bound in Sin and Held in Grace

    by Hannah Adams Ingram
  • Lent 1A (2020)

    by Israel Kamudzandu
  • Ashes and Masses Cannot Manipulate God

    by Terrance Klein
    In 1088, Urban II, a Frenchman and the former abbot of the rigorous monastery of Cluny, was elected pope. His predecessor, Gregory VII, had struggled to free the church from the control of feudal lords, and in large measure, he had succeeded. Even Emperor Henry IV eventually stood barefoot outside the papal castle in snowy Canossa, pleading with the pontiff to lift his excommunication. The cause of reformation and right had stood its ground and prevailed. Urban thought to advance his predecessor’s position. If the church could be freed from its would-be masters, why not the Holy Land itself, the spot made sacred by the birth and blood of the redeemer? And so, on November 27, 1095, in a muddy field outside the French city of Clermont, the Holy Father called for the liberation of Jerusalem...

Resources from 2017 to 2019

  • Lectionary Blog (Romans 5:12-19)

    from Desperate Preacher
  • Lent 1A (2017)

    by John Duncan
  • Changing the Story

    Video Starter by Nikki Hardeman
  • Lent 1A (2017)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Lent 1A (2017)

    by Scott Hoezee
  • Where the Wild Things Are

    by Anne Le Bas
    I’m sure many people here know Maurice Sendak’s classic children’s book, Where the Wild Things Are. Max, a small boy in an animal costume, runs riot round his house until his mother tells him he’s a wild thing and sends him to bed without his supper. But in his room a forest grows, and a boat appears and Max sails away to a distant island “where the wild things are”. They have a wonderful wild rumpus together, until Max starts to feel a bit lonely, and wants to be where “someone loved him best of all”. So he sails home to his room, and there is his supper on the table, where his mother has left it for him – “and it was still hot”, says the story. What seemed like years was really only a short time.
  • So Much More

    by Michael Ruffin
    Back when the game show Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? was all the rage, Saturday Night Live presented a parody of it (of course they did). Darrell Hammond portrayed host Regis Philbin, and Will Farrell played a contestant named Rich Preylant. (Farrell answered the first question correctly and earned $100.) When Regis said that the next question was worth two hundred dollars, Rich said, “Actually, Regis, I’m good. I think I’m gonna fold up the shop.” When Regis responded, “I’m sorry?”, Rich said, “I think I’ll fold up the shop, take my hundred dollars, go back to West Virginia, and plan my family’s future.” When Regis asked him if he was aware they’re talking about a hundred dollars, Rich said, “Yep, I am. That’s why I don’t want to risk it.” It wasn’t even a struggle for him. He was happy to have a hundred dollars. And everybody laughed. It’s funny because nobody would do that. Nobody would walk away from a potentially huge reward for the sake of holding onto a measly one hundred dollars.

Resources from 2014 to 2016

  • The Cross Beckons

    by Dan Bollerud
  • Lent 1A (2014)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Lent 1A (2014)

    by L. Ann Jervis
  • Lent 1A (2014)

    by Nicole Johnson
  • Like

    Sermon Starter by Leonard Sweet
    ("We all remember the great rallying cry of the French guards known as the 'Musketeers': 'All for one, and one for all!' That loyalty tied the Musketeers together. The safety, the life, the fate, of each individual guardsman depended upon the actions of his fellow soldiers. 'All for one, and one for all' wasn't just a motto. It was a lifeline...")
  • Lent 1A (2014)

    by Wesley White

Resources from 2011 to 2013

  • Path of God

    by Dan Bollerud
  • Lent 1A (2011)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Lent 1A (2011)

    by Lucy Lind Hogan
  • Complacent Complicity

    by Charles Love
  • Like

    Sermon Starter by Leonard Sweet
    ("Happy Lent! Oops! No such thing. Of course not. Lent is a solemn season, full of serious stuff. We run special educational courses during Lent. Baptismal candidates are on their 'cram course' during Lent. Practicing Christians are supposed to be more intentionally focused on one's prayer life during Lent...")
  • Lent 1A (2011)

    by Wesley White
  • Both, And

    by Sue Whitt

Resources from the Archives

Children's Resources and Dramas

The Classics