1 Kings 19: 1-21

New Resources

  • Proper 14B (2021)

    by Andrew Arp
  • God Gives us Cake!

    by Jazzy Bostock
  • What's in Your Heart?

    by Jim Chern
    A few weeks ago, a friend and I were playing a trivia game online. One of the questions that came up asked “This company since the year 2000 has used the tagline ‘What’s in your wallet?” We both got the question right – Capital One. I was surprised that this motto has been around that long and how quickly we were able to identify it. The marketing professionals who came up with the “What’s in your wallet” campaign explain that the question invites the viewer or listener to think about things like financial security, purchase power, and prosperity. At the same time, it is a clever way of planting doubt in minds about whether or not they have the right stuff to get all the satisfaction they are looking for in life. Of course, the intent of the ad campaign is to make people think that only this particular bank and credit card will make them satisfied, secure, and significant. And if they don’t feel secure about having the right things in their wallets, perhaps they need to reevaluate its contents...But to paraphrase that campaign, I kept hearing the Lord asking a deeper question in today’s scriptures: “What’s in your heart?”...
  • Exegesis (1 Kings 19:1-21)

    by Richard Donovan
  • Food and Work

    by Laurie Gudim
  • Food for the Journey

    by Anne Le Bas
  • Proper 14B (2021)

    by Fay Rowland
  • Bread to Carry

    by Debie Thomas

Illustrated Resources from the Archives

  • Get Up and Eat

    by John Boopalan
    In search of another home or merely to escape precarious local conditions, persons who attempt to cross boundaries often meet horrific and fatal ends. A medical examiner in Pima County Arizona, has catalogued the remains of 2615 human bodies (between 2001 and 2016), individuals who probably died in attempting boundary crossings. At the time of this writing, Scott Daniel Warren is being tried (facing up to 20 years in prison) for exercising his religious freedom to provide water, food, and clothing to Kristen Perez-Villanueva and José Arnaldo Sacaria-Goday who were trying to cross the desert...
  • The Touch That Heals

    by Tom Cox
    ("Elijah knew for sure that God was with him when he defeated 400 false prophets of Queen Jezebel; called down fire from heaven; resurrected a dead boy; outran a chariot; reprimanded an evil king. Yet when Jezebel's soldiers pursued him he got so depressed he said, 'I have had enough, Lord…Take my life…'. It was the classic H.A.L.T. syndrome...")
  • All Alone

    by Richard Donovan
    The late Henri Nouwen, Catholic priest, author, spritual giant, and professor at Yale, told this story: "This afternoon at three o'clock, my sister called from Holland to tell me that my sister-in-law had given birth to a daughter who was diagnosed as suffering from Down Syndrome.... "I know that Laurent and Heiltjen's love is being tested.... I pray tonight for them that they will be able to grow in love because of Laura, and that they will discover in her the presence of God in their lives. "Laura is going to be important for all of us in the family. We have never had a "weak" person among us. We all are hardworking, ambitious, and successful people who seldom have had to experience powerlessness. Now Laura enters and tells us a totally new story, a story of weakness, brokenness, vulnerability, and total dependency. Laura, who always will be a child, will teach us the way of Christ as no one will ever be able to do"
  • Proper 8C (2010)

    by Scott Hoezee
    ("There is an old fable that is told about the advertisement that appeared in the newspaper indicating that the devil was putting all his tools up for sale. They would all be laid out for public inspection with the prices marked on them. Those who went there were able to see that some were very treacherous tools indeed...")
  • Hearing the Silence

    by Charles Hoffacker
    It was very late at night when the young Baptist minister answered the phone. The voice on the other end threatened him with death, then hung up. The young minister walked into his kitchen, and with trembling hands put on a pot of coffee, then sank into a chair at the kitchen table. Listen now to his own words. “I was ready to give up. With my cup of coffee sitting untouched before me, I tried to think of a way to move out of the picture without appearing a coward. In this state of exhaustion, when my courage had all but gone, I decided to take my problem to God. With my head in my hands, I bowed over the kitchen table and prayed aloud. “The words I spoke to God that midnight are still vivid in my memory. ‘I am here taking a stand for what I believe is right. But now I am afraid. The people are looking to me for leadership, and if I stand before them without strength and courage, they too will falter. I am at the end of my powers. I have nothing left. I’ve come to the point where I can’t face it alone.’ “At that moment, I experienced the presence of the Divine as I had never experienced God before. It seemed as though I could hear the quiet assurance of an inner voice saying: ‘Stand up for justice, stand up for truth; and God will be at your side forever.’ Almost at once my fear began to go. My uncertainty disappeared. I was ready to face anything.” That young minister was Martin Luther King Jr...
  • God Is Not Done

    by Janet Hunt
    (" it is so that more than once, I've found myself skimming the 'want ads' --- or today's equivalent --- and wondering what life would look like if I weren't doing this. And yes, it is so that in a very real way some time ago I wandered 'a day's journey into the wilderness'... not giving up on life, no, but trying to distance myself from the beating down exhaustion of pastoral ministry....")
  • Ordinary 19B (2003)

    by Paul Larsen
    ("Some of you may remember the old promo for the Wide World of Sports about the 'Thrill of victory and the agony of defeat'. Over and over they showed this poor ski jumper who crashed and fell sideways off the 120 meter ski jump. It looked like he killed himself..." and another illustration)
  • Sermon Starters (Proper 7C)(2019)

    by Stan Mast
    As I read the story, the opening lines of a beloved old hymn came floating into my mind. “Why should I feel discouraged? Why should the shadows come? Why should my heart be lonely and long for heaven and home, When Jesus is my Savior? My constant friend is he: His Eye is on the Sparrow, and I know he watches me.”..
  • Empty or Full? (1 Kings)

    Art and Faith by Lynn Miller
    Henri Fuseli (1741-1825), a Romantic artist from Switzerland, painted a figure and called it Silence. The painting seems to be more of an opposite than an echo of the Biblical text. Fuseli's painting (below) shows a single figure sitting in the middle of dark and gloom.
  • The Lord Is About to Pass By

    by Anna Murdock
    ("My favorite book is To Kill a Mockingbird. My favorite movie of the same name. Probably my favorite scene in the movie is when the trial is over. All people sitting in the courtroom level had left. Only the balcony upstairs in the courtroom reserved for the black folk was filled with people...")
  • God in the Whisper

    by Peter Perry
    "The story is told of the boy who came forward for a children’s moment one Sunday at his church and the pastor asked the question of the children, 'Where does God live?' Little Johnny’s hand went straight up, but from experience the pastor knew better than to call on Johnny. So he said, 'Suzie, where does God live?'..." and other quotes
  • When We Say, 'Enough'!

    by Michael Phillips
    ("A great movie, in case you haven’t seen it, yet, is The Legend of Bagger Vance. The setting for the story is the deep south (Savannah, GA) amidst the great depression. The main characters are Captain Juna, played by Matt Damon, a Golf Caddy, played by Will Smith, and Juna’s high school/pre-war sweetheart played by Charlize Theron...")
  • What's God's Number?

    by Rick Miles
    You may well have been asked this question yourself by a child, perhaps your own, who simply wanted to know how God could be reached. I remember trying to address this question in a children’s sermon one Sunday Morning. I was still in seminary at that time, serving as an intern student pastor in a nearby church. One duty that fell to me was the weekly delivery of children’s sermons. There was a lovely group of about twenty children, ages ranging from about seven on down to three years old, sitting upon the steps in the front of the chancel. The “adult” sermon that morning was going to be about reaching God in prayer, so my task was to teach these children all about prayer in three minutes or less. Now, mind you, only a seminarian would attempt an assignment like this, and actually believe it could be pulled off. I had decided to tell them how prayer with God is like a conversation with a friend: we talk to him and he talks to us. In fact, prayer can be an adventure just as wondrous as talking to someone on a telephone. We can’t see them, but they’re still there. I even went so far as to bring in a visual aid; a toy telephone that responded when dialed, (Dialed! That tells you how long ago this was!), “Hi there! I want to be your friend.” This sermon couldn’t miss. That’s what I had reasoned anyway. I was just getting to the end of my three minutes with the children when I mentioned how talking with God was like talking on a telephone. Suddenly, one bright-eyed little girl looked up at me with wonder on her face and asked, “So what’s God’s number?” The entire congregation fell into uproarious laughter, and that sermon was, for all practical purposes, over...
  • Journeying Bread

    by Debie Thomas
    When I was a little girl growing up in Boston, our family vacations involved long road trips. What I remember more clearly than the destinations, though, is the food we ate along the way. Before each trip, my mom would hole up in her kitchen with a few of my aunts, and prepare a spectacular assortment of snacks and meals for the road. Fried plantains and banana chips; rice-flour-based “breads” like appams and idlis; dosas stuffed with spicy potatoes; crispy lentil patties called “vadas;” chicken biryani wrapped in single-serving aluminum foil “pockets;” and sweet cardamom cake for dessert. These were our “journeying foods,” and they made up at least half the fun (and the mess!) of each summer adventure. Sometimes we’d eat in the van, passing brown paper bags of banana chips and vadas back and forth between the rows of seats. Sometimes, my father would pull over to a rest stop, my mother would spread a bedsheet out on the grass, and we’d feast right there by the highway...
  • Stay

    by Peter Thompson
    About a decade ago, within the span of about two years, the poet and scholar Jennifer Michael Hecht lost two of her friends from graduate school to suicide. She was shocked and disheartened. To cope, she read about the history of suicide and the arguments against it. She was trying to understand why someone would want to kill themselves and to find out if there was anything anyone could say in order to prevent them from doing so. She decided to collect her thoughts into an essay that she addressed to anyone who might be thinking about suicide. Her message was simple: stay. Life can be really, really difficult, she told her readers, but ending it all hurts the people who love you and also deprives the person you could be of a chance. Hecht aimed not to condemn those who had already lost their lives to suicide, but to prevent those who were thinking about suicide from losing their lives as well. Hecht later expanded her essay into a book, which examines the history of suicide and argues vociferously against it...

Other Resources from 2020

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Other Resources from 2019

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Other Resources from 2018

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Other Resources from 2017

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Other Resources from 2015 and 2016

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Other Resources from 2013 and 2014

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Other Resources from 2010 to 2012

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Other Resources from the Archives

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Children's Resources and Dramas