Psalm 107

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  • Anticipating Thanks

    Video with Eric Anderson
  • Lent 4B (2021)

    by Aaron Bolerjack
  • Proper 7B (2021)

    by Nancy deClaissé-Walford
  • Exegesis (Psalm 107)

    by Richard Donovan
  • Let the Redeemed Pray the Psalms

    by Kerry Hasler-Brooks
  • Lent 4B (2021)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Proper 7B (2021)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Sermon Starters (Lent 4B)(2021)

    by Scott Hoezee
    In his book Not the Way It’s Supposed to Be, Neal Plantinga notes at one point that for now and in this world nothing set our tongues to wagging like bad news. Bad news spreads like wildfire. The news media is all over bad news. We regale one another with the bad things that happen, write Op-Eds for newspapers about it. But one day in God’s bright kingdom, things will be different. People will sit on their front porches and call out to passersby to lift up and celebrate good and positive things! We will get effusive about lovely acts and most certainly about the loving deeds of God that led to salvation. We just won’t be able to get enough of the good stuff! This also reminds me of an observation in Marilynne Robinson’s luminous epistolary novel Gilead. At one point the book’s narrator, the Rev. John Ames, muses if we will remember our lives on earth once we get to “heaven.” Some say no, we ought not remember our old troubles in a fallen world. But Ames thinks otherwise. “In eternity this world will be like Troy, I believe, and all that has passed here will be the epic of the universe, the ballad they sing in the streets.” Remembering some of what was difficult will be the path to do what Psalm 107 says: ponder God’s loving deeds by which he rescued us from so much sorrow.
  • Sermon Starters (Proper 7B)(2021)

    by Scott Hoezee
    In his book Not the Way It’s Supposed to Be, Neal Plantinga notes at one point that for now and in this world nothing set our tongues to wagging like bad news. Bad news spreads like wildfire. The news media is all over bad news. We regale one another with the bad things that happen, write Op-Eds for newspapers about it. But one day in God’s bright kingdom, things will be different. People will sit on their front porches and call out to passersby to lift up and celebrate good and positive things! We will get effusive about lovely acts and most certainly about the loving deeds of God that led to salvation. We just won’t be able to get enough of the good stuff! This also reminds me of an observation in Marilynne Robinson’s luminous epistolary novel Gilead. At one point the book’s narrator, the Rev. John Ames, muses if we will remember our lives on earth once we get to “heaven.” Some say no, we ought not remember our old troubles in a fallen world. But Ames thinks otherwise. “In eternity this world will be like Troy, I believe, and all that has passed here will be the epic of the universe, the ballad they sing in the streets.” Remembering some of what was difficult will be the path to do what Psalm 107 says: ponder God’s loving deeds by which he rescued us from so much sorrow.
  • Lent 4B (2021)

    by Rolf Jacobson
  • They Cried

    Art and Faith by Lynn Miller
    Pablo Picasso's masterpiece Guernica was painted in response to a very specific event: the bombing of the Basque town of Guernica by the Nazi air force in support of Francisco Franco. The town, of little or no strategic value, was attacked over three hours by 25 bombers who dropped 100,000 pounds of explosive and incendiary bombs. Another wave of bombers strafed any survivors trying to flee the village that was now only rubble. The town burned for three days. The mural-sized painting (approximately 11 feet by 25 feet) was commissioned in 1936 for the 1937 World's Fair in Paris. Picasso was supposed to create a piece for the Spanish Pavilion that followed the Fair's theme celebrating modern technology. Instead, Picasso painted this...
  • Giving Voice

    by AnnaKate Rawles
  • Proper 26A

    by Howard Wallace
  • Lent 4B

    by Howard Wallace
  • God Is With Us in the Storms of Life

    by Garth Wehrfritz-Hanson
    The African Queen tells the story of Charlie Allnut (played by Humphrey Bogart), a hard drinker who runs a small steamboat, the African Queen, through the shallow rivers of East Africa in the early 1900s, bringing dynamite, gin, supplies, and tools to European speculators and miners. He also carries the mail to Rose (played by Katherine Hepburn), a missionary. When World War I breaks out and the Germans burn Rose’s home and church, the British missionary and Canadian boatman flee in the African Queen. Their destination is a large lake downriver, where they hope to assist the Allied war effort by blowing up a German destroyer. On the river they face one danger after another. Insects attack. Bullets whiz by as they pass a German-held fort. They fight rapids. With a lot of moxie they survive these tests, but then the river dissipates and splits into a hundred streams. The African Queen bogs down in a marsh. With no current to push them along, Charlie and Rose use poles to propel forward, and eventually Charlie has to wade the shallows, pulling the boat by a rope. He shudders when he finds leeches on his back and arms, but he grimly returns to the water, and soon Rose herself slogs through the marsh, hacking a path with a machete while Charlie pulls. Eventually they come to the end of their strength. The boat is stuck on a mudflat, and Charlie is feverish. He says, “Rosie, you want to know the truth, don’t you? Even if we had all our strength, we’d never get he off this mud. We’re finished.” She responds simply, “I know it,” and they resign themselves to death in the wasteland. As Charlie drifts to sleep, Rose offers a simple prayer of resignation: “We’ve come to the end of our journey. In a little while we will stand before you....Open the doors of heaven for Charlie and me.” But the camera slowly draws back to reveal what the couple cannot see because of the reeds—the African Queen is less than a hundred yards from the shining lake. The camera then transports us far upstream to the river’s headwaters. A torrential rainstorm is sending animals scurrying for cover. Further downstream, the rains have turned the rapids into cataracts. Down on the mudflat a small channel begins to run through the reeds. The channel swells, gently lifts the Queen off the mudflat, and carries it to the lake. Charlie and Rose awaken to the gentle rocking of the boat and a refreshing breeze...

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  • Revival

    by Craig Condon
  • Lent 4B (2018)

    by Bruce N. G. Cromwell
  • Lent 4B (2018)

    by Nancy deClaissé-Walford
  • Proper 7B (2018)

    by Nancy deClaissé-Walford
  • Steadfast Love

    by Nikki Hardeman
  • Lent 4B (2018)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Lent 4B (2015)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Proper 7B (2018)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Proper 7B (2015)

    by Philip Heinze
  • Immigration: Journey to a New Life

    by Lisa Nichols Hickman
  • Oh, Give Thanks

    Art and Theology by Victoria Jones
    includes link to “Oh Give Thanks (Psalm 107)” by Wendell Kimbrough
  • Lent 4B (2015)

    by James Limburg
  • Sermon Starters (Lent 4B)(2018)

    by Stan Mast
    Psalm 107 opens with a call for corporate thanksgiving: “Let the redeemed of the Lord say this….” But such group thanksgiving is becoming increasingly rare. One of the chief reasons is the sheer inconvenience of corporate worship. I was convicted by a recent piece in The Christian Century by publisher, Peter Marty. Entitled “Church is Inconvenient,” it makes the point that church is a bother in many ways. Convenience often feels great, says Marty, but it’s not an unalloyed good. For example, he points out that if we only exercise when it is convenient, we will not enjoy maximum health. And he concludes that the inconvenience of worshiping together is central to a healthy spiritual life. “We Christians love to talk about Jesus, and with good reason. But it’s impossible to have Jesus apart from the church. Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s reading of the apostle Paul led him to say that we cannot know Christ apart from Christian community, because the church is Christ’s body.”
  • Sermon Starters (Proper 26A)(2017)

    by Stan Mast
    The Psalmist is priming the pump of thanksgiving. You might need to explain that image to children. Back in the olden days when people got water out of a well by vigorously pumping a big iron handle, sometimes they had to pour a bucket of water down the well to get the water flowing. That was called priming the pump. Or to put it another, more modern way, Psalm 107 is designed to jump start the engine of thanksgiving. When your car won’t start of a frigid morning, you can use a set of jumper cables to connect your dead battery to a battery of a car that is already running. The current from the good battery will get your dead battery started...
  • God's Love Is Steadfast

    by Kate Matthews
    includes several quotes
  • Proper 7B (2015)

    by Scott Shauf
  • Proper 13C (2019)

    by Cara Shonamon

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