Psalm 13: 1-6

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Resources from 2014 to 2020

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  • It’s All Held By God

    by Anne Moman Brock
  • Christ Is Our Peace

    by Kathy Donley
    One Sunday in the 1940’s, a young woman invited her boyfriend to go to church with her. Both of them were African American, but the church they attended that day was all white and right in the heart of segregated America. The young man waited in the pews while the congregation went forward to receive communion. He was anxious because everyone was drinking from the same chalice. He had never seen black people and white people drink from the same water fountain, much less the same cup. He kept watching his girlfriend. She received the bread and waited for the cup. Finally, the priest lowered it to her lips and said, what he had said to the others, “The blood of Christ, shed for you.” The man decided that any church where black and white people drank from the same cup had discovered something powerful, something he wanted to be a part of. That boyfriend and girlfriend stayed together and got married. In time, they had a son they named Michael. We know him as the Rev. Michael Curry, He is the presiding bishop of the Episcopal church in the USA...
  • Narrative Lectionary Podcast (2017)

    with Rolf Jacobson, Craig Koester and Kathryn Schifferdecker
  • Singing the Psalms

    Art and Faith by Lynn Miller
    Oswaldo Guayasamin was born in Quito, Ecuador, in 1919. His work titled "The Cry" seems to better capture the emotion of Psalm 13. This is not a calm, still, muted emotion. This is a cry that involves mouth and face and eyes and hands and head. How long, O Lord? Will you forget me forever? We can almost imagine the triptych as three stills from a movie clip following the facial expressions of the one crying out...
  • How Long, O Lord?

    by David Russell
    Martin Marty is a longtime church historian, maybe the leading authority on American religion and culture, now retired from the University of Chicago. Years ago, after the death of his wife, he wrote a moving book reflecting on the Psalms titled A Cry of Absence. There is a kind of summery spirituality, a spirituality of joy and praise and thanksgiving. But Marty wrote about those more difficult times, the winter times of the soul. Roughly half of the Psalms fit a wintry sort of spirituality. Marty wrote, Winterless climates there may be, but winterless souls are hard to picture. A person can count on winter in January in intemperate northern climates, or in July in their southern counterparts. Near the equator, winter is unfelt. As for the heart, however, where can one escape the chill?...
  • The Lord Will Provide

    by Keith Wagner
  • Proper 8A

    by Howard Wallace et al
  • Proper 8A (2014)

    by Wesley White

Resources from the Archives

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)
  • It's Your Move!

    by Robert AuBuchon, Jr.
  • Honest to God

    by George Butterfield
  • Lectionary Blog (Psalm 13)

    from Desperate Preacher
  • You Gotta Have Hope!

    by Thomas Fischer
  • Calling from the Pit

    by Ken Gehrels
  • Wrestling in Sorrow

    by Ken Gehrels
  • Why Cry?

    by Lisa Johnson
  • Life Between Verses 4 and 5

    by David Leininger
    And now we come to the Lord's Supper. The poet, who is one whose life HAS tumbled in, and wonders whether or not it is safe to give voice to the pain here, asks: Is there no place at the table for damaged hearts and scarred souls? Do you not invite everyone who believes? I believe. Oh God, I believe.(5) The poet happens to be Ann Weems, a Presbyterian, the wife of a Presbyterian minister even. Her son Todd had been brutally murdered just after his 21st birthday. How does a mother deal with such a devastating blow? Friends tried to help and offer consolation. One was a seminary professor who called to her attention all the biblical material - the laments - that seemed to be saying so much of exactly what she was feeling. Noting her prodigious talent, he encouraged her to put her feelings to paper. The result is a remarkable compilation that not only helped her healing process, it has helped thousands of others as well. The book is called simply Psalms of Lament. My copy says, "To David, Through Tears - With Hope. Ann Weems." Her poetic preface, composed after her work was done, describes "life between verses 4 and 5": In the godforsaken, obscene quicksand of life, there is a deafening alleluia rising from the souls of those who weep, and of those who weep with those who weep. If you watch, you will see the hand of God putting the stars back in their skies one by one...
  • Psalms of Lament

    by David Leininger
  • Honest to God

    by Carol Miles
  • A Song for All Seasons

    by Hedley Palmer
  • The Lord Will Provide

    by Keith Wagner
    Eric Allenbaugh was a student in Southern California about thirty years ago. After a football game in the fall of 1959, he and his girlfriend were leaving the stadium when someone kicked him from behind. When he turned around he encountered one of the local teen gangs, armed with brass knuckles. They beat him and he ended up in the hospital with internal bleeding and a concussion. He nearly died. Fortunately, his girlfriend was not harmed.
    After he recovered, some of his friends approached him and said, “Let’s go get those guys!” Unfortunately retaliation is the way these kind of problems are often settled. Part of Eric said, “Yes,” but part of him said, “No.” He knew revenge did not work. It only accelerates and intensifies conflict. He wanted to do something that would break the chain of counterproductive events. So Eric gathered a diverse group of kids and they formed the “Brotherhood Committee” to work on reducing racial tension. Not everyone bought into this program of cross-cultural exchange but many joined the effort. Two years later, Eric became the student body president and about 3,000 students joined in the effort to do things differently. They built bridges between cultures and ethnic groups. Their efforts made a tremendous difference in the community. Hate and indifference were replaced with trust and cooperation.
  • How Long, O Lord?

    by Garth Wehrfritz-Hanson
  • Proper 8A (2014)

    by Wesley White
  • Proper 8A (2008)

    by Wesley White
  • A Lament Psalm

    by Sue Whitt

Children's Resources

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The Classics

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