Psalm 25

Quick Locator

ReadingsRelated PagesResourcesInformation
Links
105
Categories
8
Last Updated
2¼ hours ago
Last Checked
last Thursday, 5:05 am

New Resources

  • Aid, Truth and Mercy

    Video with Eric Anderson
  • Lent 1B (2021)

    by Andrew Arp
  • Lent 1B (2021)

    by Nancy deClaissé-Walford
  • Exegesis (Psalm 25)

    by Richard Donovan
  • Lent 1B (2021)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Sermon Starters (Lent 1B)(2021)

    by Scott Hoezee
    Sometimes it seems that for all the appeal it has on the surface—and for all the things about it that really are correct—the “What Would Jesus Do?” mantra needs almost as often as not to be replaced with—or at least supplemented by—another question: What Would Jesus NOT Do? What would Jesus NOT say? It sometimes feels like a lot of ugly things that also Christians say and do—sometimes to even fellow Christians on Facebook much less to people who do not share the Christian faith—would be avoided if we wondered what Jesus would not do or say...
  • Lent 1B

    by Howard Wallace
  • God the Loving, Merciful and Gracious Teacher

    by Garth Wehrfritz-Hanson
    A Catholic priest living in the Philippines was a much-loved man of God who once carried a secret burden of long-past sin buried deep in his heart. He had committed that sin once, many years before, during his time in seminary. No one else knew of this sin. He had repented of it and he had suffered years of remorse for it, but he still had no peace, no inner joy, no sense of God’s forgiveness. There was a woman in this priest’s parish who deeply loved God, and who claimed to have visions in which she spoke with Christ, and He with her. The priest, however, was skeptical of her claims, so to test her visions he said to her, “You say you actually speak directly with Christ in your visions. Let me ask you a favour. The next time you have one of these visions, I want you to ask Him what sin your priest committed while he was in seminary.” The woman agreed and went home. When she returned to the church a few days later, the priest said, “Well, did Christ visit you in your dreams?” She replied, “Yes, He did.” “And did you ask Him what sin I committed in seminary?” “Yes, I asked Him.” “Well, what did He say?” “He said, ‘I don’t remember.’”

Resources from 2020

  • Godric's Prayer

    by Frederick Buechner
  • Proper 21A (2020)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Sermon Starters (Proper 21A)(2020)

    by Scott Hoezee
    Sometimes it seems that for all the appeal it has on the surface—and for all the things about it that really are correct—the “What Would Jesus Do?” mantra needs almost as often as not to be replaced with—or at least supplemented by—another question: What Would Jesus NOT Do? What would Jesus NOT say? It sometimes feels like a lot of ugly things that also Christians say and do—sometimes to even fellow Christians on Facebook much less to people who do not share the Christian faith—would be avoided if we wondered what Jesus would not do or say. Jesus would not fire off an email in anger. He would not sneer at another person on Facebook in sarcasm over even some post Jesus himself disagreed with. Jesus would not assign libelous or mean-spirited labels to people of different political viewpoints on certain hot button issues of the day. None of that is to say Jesus would be silent or would fail to address anything he deemed important. But how would he do it? A lot of the time the Gospel indicates he would most assuredly not do it the way too many of us do. And let’s be honest: even if it is genuinely not always easy to answer the question “What Would Jesus Do?”, if we eliminated up front all the things Jesus would NOT do, our lives and the world in general would be a much better place.
  • Proper 21A (2020)

    by Paul O. Myhre

Resources from 2016 to 2019

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tab”. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)
  • Lent 1B (2018)

    by Andrew Arp
  • Proper 21A (2017)

    by Jon Gildner
  • Proper 13C (2019)

    by Joel LeMon
  • Advent 1C (2018)

    by Jon Gildner
  • Advent 1C (2018)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Lent 1B (2018)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Proper 21A (2017)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Proper 10C (2016)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Preaching Helps (Advent 1C)(2018)

    by Scott Hoezee
    Some time ago I read an article about memory in which the author pointed out that printing written materials was never designed to replace memory but to help us memorize better. But over time, precisely because we have so much that is already written down, the act of memorizing has waned. It is sort of like what happens when you get a telephone which can store twenty or so phone numbers in its memory: eventually you forget the very numbers you call the most frequently. “My phone has memory, I don’t” we sometimes joke. And it’s true. So it goes with many things, including Scripture...
  • Sermon Starters (Proper 10C)(2019)

    by Scott Hoezee
    Some time ago I read an article about memory in which the author pointed out that printing written materials was never designed to replace memory but to help us memorize better. But over time, precisely because we have so much that is already written down, the act of memorizing has waned. This is also why we don’t even know the telephone numbers of people we call all the time: they are stored in the phone’s memory so you just hit “Jill” such that if you ever need to call Jill from a phone that is not yours . . . These days if you want to win “Jeopardy” on TV like the recent champ Mr. Holzhauer, you had better know a lot in your head. For most of us, though, we don’t need to remember stuff: we can always look it up on line after all. So it goes with many things, including Scripture. When you’ve got a half-dozen Bibles scattered around your house, you assume that you have such ready access to the Bible that you don’t need to spend much time memorizing its texts or meditating on them. But even as storing a number into the memory of your phone is very different than storing it in your own brain, so also the words in an unopened Bible on the shelf next to the dinner table: those words are not going to float across thin air and somehow become part of who you are. Making them part of your very self requires reading, reflecting, memorizing.
  • Lent 1B (2018)

    by Stan Mast
    As I reflected on the blessing of knowing God’s ways, several cultural references rose to the surface of my brain from my long forgotten past. I saw Ricky Schroder (remember that adorable little boy) as a fuzzy cheeked young detective in the gritty crime drama, “NYPD Blue.” He is struggling not only with his new job as a homicide detective, but also with his out of control life as a twenty something. He sobs to his partner, “I don’t know how to live my life.” How many twenty somethings would say the same thing today? Instead of inventing a life (the typical postmodern response to the difficulty of living in a rudderless world), why not listen to the Lord who wants to teach us how to live? That old TV series reminded me of all old rock song by the Zombies, “Time of the Season.”...
  • Lent 1B (2018)

    by Kate Matthews
    Scroll down the page for this resource.
  • Lent 1B (2018)

    by J. Clinton McCann
  • Proper 21A (2017)

    by Paul Myhre
  • Advent 1C (2018)

    by Beth Tanner

Resources from 2011 to 2015

Resources from the Archives

Children's Resources

Currently Unavailable