Psalm 72:1-19

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Resources from 2019

  • Advent 2A (2019)

    by Walter Bouzard
  • Like Rain

    by Laurel Dykstra
  • Epiphany (C)(2019)

    by Joe Gorman
  • Advent 2A (2019)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Epiphany (C)(2019)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Sermon Starters (Advent 2A)(2019)

    by Scott Hoezee
    Jimmy Carter is now not only the oldest currently living former President of the United States but he has now lived to become the oldest former President ever. Strikingly, he has also been a former President for nearly 39 years. During those almost four decades of time, Carter’s reputation has soared but, of course, he left office after a single term that most observers regarded as a failed presidency. In addition to the energy crisis and the tanking of the economy, America on Carter’s watch also got embroiled in a hostage crisis in Iran from which Carter and his team could not extricate themselves. The final humiliation for Carter was having it fall to Ronald Reagan immediately after his inauguration to announce that Iran was releasing the hostages that very day. Reagan tried to give credit to Carter for his diplomatic efforts that quite literally went up to the final hour of Carter’s term, but it was too late. Carter was deemed a failure. What people may forget, however, is that Jimmy Carter was the first President who made human rights the cornerstone of his foreign policy. Politics, economics, military aid, peace negotiations, foreign assistance: everything was secondary to any given nation’s treatment of its people. Strikingly, this had never before been the guiding concern of any President in the past. It may be fair to say that neither has it been priority #1 of any President since Carter, either...
  • Sermon Starters (Epiphany)(C)(2019)

    by Scott Hoezee
    “Poverty” by Frederick Buechner, Wishful Thinking: A Theological ABC. San Francisco, Harper & Row, 1973, pp. 69-70. “In a sense we are all hungry and in need, but most of us don’t recognize it. With plenty to eat in the deepfreeze, with a roof over our heads and a car in the garage, we assume that the empty feeling inside must just be a case of the blues that can be cured by a weekend in the country or an extra martini at lunch or the purchase of a color TV. The poor, on the other hand, are under no such delusion. When Jesus says ‘Come unto me all ye who labor and are heavy laden and I will give you rest,’ the poor stand a better chance than most of knowing what he’s talking about and knowing that he’s talking to them. In desperation they may even be willing to consider the possibility of accepting his offer. This is perhaps why Jesus on several occasions called the poor peculiarly blessed.”
  • Advent 2A (2019)

    by Matt Pollock
  • Epiphany (C)(2019)

    by Beth Tanner

Resources from 2015 to 2018

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)
  • Advent 2A (2016)

    by Paul Berge
  • Prayer for Wisdom

    by Bob Cornwall
  • Epiphany (B)(2015)

    by Fred Gaiser
  • Advent 2A (2016)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Epiphany (B)(2018)

    by James Howell
  • Epiphany (A)(2016)

    by Rolf Jacobson
  • Advent 2A (2016)

    by Stan Mast
    Now that the elections are now over, the frequency and necessity of “fact checking” after the Presidential debates might be a good counter example of what we need in a “King.” When you can’t trust the righteousness of a candidate, it is hard to believe that the presidency of such a candidate will be characterized by justice. Such campaign shenanigans make us long for the Coming King who will rule with righteousness and justice.
  • Epiphany (B)(2018)

    by Ryan Quanstrom
  • Religious Liberty or Social Mischief?

    by Ken Sehested
    If you believe in the separation of church and state, you must get to know the story of Roger Williams, a Puritan pastor who in 1631 migrated from Britain to the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He was a troublemaker from the beginning because of his convictions about what he called “soul liberty.” His thinking about faith includes a firm disavowal of the divine rights of kings and clergy alike. He is the one who first used the phrase about a “wall of separation between church and state,” though Thomas Jefferson would later get the credit for this phrase, one that was built into the First Amendment to the Constitution which says “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof. . . .”
  • Epiphany (A)(2017)

    by Kelvin St. John
  • The King We Need

    by Carl Wilton

Resources from the Archives

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)

Children's Resources

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)

The Classics

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)

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