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Memorial Day (Veteran's Day)(Remembrance Day)

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  • A Peace Remembered: Lest We Forget

    by Dawn Hutchings
    The young woman can still remember one particular Remembrance Day when her words and actions did nothing more than offend someone she loved so very much. It was the one and only argument she ever had with her Grandmother and it happened over Remembrance Day. At the time, the young woman was living and working in London. She remembers noticing that Londoners take Remembrance Day very seriously indeed. More so, she thought, than in her native Canada. She wondered if the blitz had something to do with this. While most of the poppies people wore were red, she began to see white poppies appear on the lapels of more than just a few people. She read in the newspaper that those who were committed to peace and believed that, for the most part, Remembrance Day only serves to glorify war, were donning white poppies...

Resources from 2018 and 2019

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  • Some Thoughts on Memorial Day and Easter 7

    by Owen Griffiths
    I stood looking down at the beautiful young woman in the casket, and I thought of Shakespeare’s words when Romeo looked at the dead Juliet: “Death, that hath sucked the honey of thy breath, Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty: Thou art not conquer’d; beauty’s ensign yet Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks, And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.” This Juliet was a sergeant in the United States Marine Corp. She wanted to be a Marine because she’d heard it was the toughest branch of the military, and she wanted to be up for the challenge of being a badass. She served two enlistments, including a tour in Iraq. She died this past spring at the age of thirty from a drug overdose.
  • Veteran's Day

    by Owen Griffiths
    I caught sight of my neighbor Frank in the rearview mirror as I was driving out of the Wawa parking lot with my morning coffee. Frank is an incredibly charming guy. I’ve seen pictures of him when he was young, and he was dashingly handsome in his day. Today he’s rounder and bald, but he still has a gallant panache. I watched as he held the door for an elderly lady. In his elegant fashion, he made a deep bow as she passed by him. I’m certain this must’ve brought a smile to her face—a display of courtesy from the Sir Walter Raleigh of the Wawa. I’ll bet that lady never suspected that, almost half a century before, that same polite man at the convenience store was bleeding to death on a hilltop in Vietnam. Frank fought with 101st Airborne Division on a hill called Firebase Ripcord. Most of us never heard about Ripcord. After the carnage of “Hamburger Hill,” the Department of Defense decided to blackout all news of this battle...
  • Lest We Forget: A Peace Remembered

    by Dawn Hutchings
    The young woman can still remember one particular Remembrance Day when her words and actions did nothing more than offend someone she loved very much. It was the one and only argument she ever had with her Grandmother and it happened over Remembrance Day. At the time, she was living in London. She remembers thinking that Londoners take Remembrance Day very seriously indeed. More so, she thought, than in her native Canada. She wondered if the blitz had something to do with it. While most of the poppies people wore were red, she began to see white poppies appear on the lapels of more than just a few people. She read in the newspaper that those who were committed to peace and believed that for the most part, Remembrance Day only serves to glorify war were donning white poppies...
  • 100 Years After the Great War, What Can We Say to an Exhausted World?

    by Terrance Klein
    Although written before the war, these lines from A. E. Housman capture both the honor that older men preach to younger men and the senseless death that these “lads” suffer. Here dead we lie because we did not choose To live and shame the land from which we sprung. Life, to be sure, is nothing much to lose, But young men think it is, and we were young...
  • Living Among the Ruins

    by Anne Le Bas
    Anne Frank, faced with the worst which human beings can do during WW2, wrote this in her wartime diary. “In spite of everything I still believe that people are really good at heart. I simply can’t build up my hopes on a foundation consisting of confusion, misery, and death. I see the world gradually being turned into a wilderness, I hear the ever approaching thunder, which will destroy us too, I can feel the sufferings of millions and yet, if I look up into the heavens, I think that it will all come right, that this cruelty too will end, and that peace and tranquillity will return again.” She may not, herself, have lived to see it, but she wasn’t wrong.
  • Now What?

    by Anne Le Bas
  • Remembrance Sunday

    by Anne Le Bas
  • Moral Injury: The Devil That Looks to Devour

    by Brian Powers
    In the earliest parts of my military training, I recall being taught that Memorial Day should not be confused with Veterans’ Day because it remembers those who have made “the ultimate sacrifice,” having died in the service of our country. Veterans’ Day, by contrast, celebrates those who have survived the conflicts and returned to civilian life. Trauma researchers might argue that this line is not as clear as it may seem. They note that experiences of extreme stress, particularly among those who have survived combat, can be described as encounters with death that establish a hold on the survivors and disrupt their abilities to envision and live out a positive future.
  • Conflicting Memorials

    by Ken Sehested
    My earliest memory of Memorial Day is of my Dad, puttering in his garage shop (he was a mechanic and jack-of-all-trades fixer-upper) on a rare day off from work, listening to the Indianapolis 500 car race on a portable radio. On one of those occasions, I remember using a hammer, and the concrete garage floor, helping him to straighten nails for reuse. Both of my parents were children of the Depression. Thrift was a a primal virtue even when it was no longer a necessity.
  • To End All Wars

    by Gord Waldie

Resources from 2016 and 2017

  • Lest We Forget

    by Dawn Hutchings
    The young woman can still remember one particular Remembrance Day when her words and actions did nothing more than offend someone she loved very much. It was the one and only argument she ever had with her Grandmother and it happened over Remembrance Day. At the time, she was living in London. She remembers thinking that Londoners take Remembrance Day very seriously indeed. More so, she thought, than in her native Canada. She wondered if the blitz had something to do with it. While most of the poppies people wore were red, she began to see white poppies appear on the lapels of more than just a few people. She read in the newspaper that those who were committed to peace and believed that for the most part, Remembrance Day only serves to glorify war were donning white poppies...
  • As He Died to Make Men Holy

    by Terrance Klein
    A fervent abolitionist, Julia Ward Howe regretted that she couldn’t take up arms to free the slaves. One day, Julia watched a review of Union troops outside of Washington. They were singing “John’s Brown’s Body” a ballad extolling the executed abolitionist, who had made Kansas bleed and the nation tremble because, as he had proclaimed, God’s justice demanded the immediate emancipation of the slaves. The United States government hung John Brown, but the future he foresaw still came to pass. In the first moments of consciousness, Julia Ward Howe’s creativity penned what we now call “The Battle Hymn of the Republic.”
  • A Little Child Shall Lead Them

    by Anne Le Bas
    In early September 1939 the largest mass movement of children that has ever taken place in the UK got underway. It’s estimated that at the start of WW2 something like 1.5 million children were evacuated from their homes to areas thought to be safer. I know that there are people here this morning who have personal or family experience of being evacuated or receiving evacuees. Some children were even sent overseas. My grandmother thought very seriously about sending my mother, aged 7, and her 5 year old sister from Plymouth to family members in South Africa, to escape the bombing in Plymouth, only changing her mind when several ships carrying evacuees were torpedoed. There were agonizing choices to be made...
  • Remembrance Day

    by Marjory Maclean
  • Remembrance Sunday

    by Bridget Nichols
  • Remembrance Day

    by Fabian Radcliffe, OP
  • Remembrance Sunday

    by Charles Royden and Sam Cappleman

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