John 14: 23-29

Illustrated New Resources

  • A Cure for Fear?

    by Jim Chern
    Imagine the next time you are going to your local CVS, Rite Aid, or Pharmacy aisle at your local supermarket… and as you’re picking up Advil for headaches; Zantac for heart burn; Claratin for your allergies (perhaps I’m revealing too much here… anyway) you make your way down the aisle you are able to pick up a drug to cure fear. That’s not a premise to some science fiction story – but something that appears to be a not so far off reality. The New York Times not too long ago reported that scientists are working on a drug that will not simply numb you or sedate you when you are anxious about something to alleviate those symptoms – but promises to erase the fear that is tied to specific memories or things...
  • Sermon Starters (Easter 6C)(2019)

    by Scott Hoezee
    As C.S. Lewis once said, we too often substitute religion for God. But that is like substituting navigation for arrival or wooing for marriage. Getting to your destination is wonderful but the trip itself is also valuable. Courtship, dating, the thrill of romance you experience when you are wooing someone to marry you is thrilling, unique, scintillating. But the journey toward a whole, wholesome, and goodly marriage continues long after courtship ends...
  • Wonderfully Made, Ever-Evolving Humans in an Ever-Changing Cosmos

    by Dawn Hutchings
    It reminds me of a story I heard years ago about a little girl who went to Vacation Bible School. Her favourite thing about Vacation Bible School was the singing, and her favourite song was, “I’ve God the Joy in My Heart”. It’s the kind of song that can very easily become an ear worm. “I’ve got the joy, joy, joy, joy, Down in my heart (where?) Down in my heart (where?) Down in my heart Down in my heart to stay.” But for this little girl it was the second verses that stuck with her. When she got home her parents were surprised and amused to hear their little girl, sing the second verse with such gusto. Do you remember the second verse? “I’ve got the peace that passes understanding down in my heart, (where?”) Down in my heart (where?) Down in my heart Down in my heart to stay.” Except this little girl kept singing over and over again: “I’ve got a piece of pastor’s understanding down in my heart, down in my heart (where)”...
  • Gospel According to "Game of Thrones"

    by Terrance Klein
    “Game of Thrones” is a terrific drama, played out in fictional history. Christianity’s core claim is that history itself is a great drama, an epic struggle between light and darkness. Yet the core of the Christian faith is that good and evil are at war and have been for as far back as memory goes. Scholars call this “salvation history,” but ordinary people know it as the ongoing, daily struggle between right and wrong, one that surges around and within every human being. Moreover, just as in “Game of Thrones,” in the real world it is hard to know who is what and which side is winning. Good and evil are entwined in a violent vortex. The sole constant is that the powerful continue to oppress the weak...
  • An Adequate Peace?

    Art and Faith by Lynn Miller
    John 14.23-29 is part of what is usually called Jesus' "Farewell Discourse." He says to the disciples that though he himself is leaving, he is leaving an advocate with them. An advocate who will teach them and remind them. Jesus also promises to leave "peace" with them. He says it may not look like the world imagines peace to be, but it will, indeed, be peace. How would you illustrate any of that - what "the advocate" looks or feels like, what peace (either the world's or Jesus') looks like? The illustration below, titled "In the Dale" includes the text of John 14:27: "My peace I give you..." In this work, "peace" seems associated with land and house, with calm waters, with neutral colors...
  • Whispering the Lyrics

    Sermon Starter by Leonard Sweet
    Stashed away in a drawer somewhere around my house, now nearly forgotten, is a batch of old 45 rpm records from the '50's and early '60's. Here and there in this dusty stack, one can find an occasional recording by the great bluesmaster Jimmy Reed. A share-cropper's son, Reed brought the throbbing harmonica-and-guitar-driven black rhythm-and-blues of the Mississippi Delta into the popular rock-and-roll mainstream. My high school friends and I, fancying ourselves a budding rock band, would play and replay these recordings -- "Big Boss Man," "Bright Lights, Big City," "Hush, Hush," "Baby What You Want Me To Do" -- trying to imitate Reed's hypnotic rhythms on our cheap Silvertone electric guitars, attempting in vain to capture the pain-soaked cries of his mahogany voice in our too-tight, too-white, suburban throats.

    However, in placing the phonograph needle again and again in the grooves of Jimmy Reed's records, we began to notice something curious. If one listened very carefully, there could sometimes be heard, ever so faintly in the background, a soft woman's voice murmuring in advance the next verse of the song. The story that grew up around this -- and perhaps it is true -- was that Jimmy Reed was so absorbed in the bluesy beat and the throbbing guitar riffs of his music that he simply could not remember the words of his own songs. He needed help with the lyrics, and the woman's voice was none other than that of his wife, devotedly coaching her husband through the recording session by whispering the upcoming stanzas into his ear as he sang...

Other New Resources

Recommended Resources

{Based on requests from several members (although I am reluctant to do so since my favorites may not be those of others), I am listing here some of my own favorite resources. FWIW!!]
  • Peace

    Illustrations from the Archives
  • *Peace I Leave You

    by Jerry Fuller, OMI
    ("As the eldest of three daughters, I was the designated babysitter in my family. From the time I was twelve, I was the one my parents left in charge when they went out at night. First my father would sit me down and remind me how much he trusted me - not only because I was the oldest but also because I was the most responsible...")
  • The Gift of Peace

    by Sil Galvan
    The cardinal is dying, and he is dying a remarkable death. Even until this very moment, he has spent months teaching his last lesson by sharing his final earthly days with the entire world. In August 1996, at the age of 68, he found out that he had less than a year to live due to pancreatic cancer. "Well," he calmly told his oncologist, "this changes everything. Now I have an opportunity to live what I've been telling people: that we have to look at death as a friend."
  • Peace That the World Cannot Give

    by Sil Galvan
    Today, when I awoke, I suddenly realized that this is the best day of my life, ever! There were times when I wondered if I would make it to today; but I did! And because I did, I'm going to celebrate! Today, I'm going to celebrate what an unbelievable life I've had so far: the accomplishments, the many blessings, and, yes, even the hardships, because they have made me stronger. I will go through this day with my head held high and a happy heart. I will marvel at God's seemingly simple gifts: the morning dew, the sun, the clouds, the trees, the flowers, the birds. Today, none of these miraculous creations will escape my notice. Today, I will share my excitement for life with other people. I'll make someone smile.
  • Easter 6C

    by Bill Loader
    always good insights!
  • Exegetical Notes (Easter 6C)

    by Brian Stoffregen
    (always excellent exegesis)
  • Stealth Insight and a Special Peace

    by D. Mark Davis
    (Includes lots of Greek exegesis!!)

Illustrated Resources from 2016 to 2018

  • A Cure for Fear

    by Jim Chern
    The New York Times  last January reported that scientists are working on a drug that will not simply numb you or sedate you when you are anxious about something to alleviate those symptoms - but promises to erase the fear that are tied to specific memories. Using a test group of arachnaphobes to illustrate how this works - they had three groups of people who were petrified of spiders. Group One was shown a tarantula and then given the drug; Group Two was shown the spider and given a sugar pill or a placebo; and Group Three was given the drug first and then shown the tranatula.
  • The Word That Defies Death: Shakespeare and Jesus

    by Nancy Rockwell
    In the week we read this, the English speaking world will mark the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death, and do so in part by acknowledging how his turns of phrase have become commonplace in our mouths. Even in the mouths of those who never read books, let alone plays, let alone Shakespeare’s plays. Shakespeare has shaped the language we speak, has formed our thinking and our values. Here are just a few phrases Shakespeare coined that pop out of our mouths:
  • Easter Arsonists of the Heart

    by Ron Rolheiser, OMI
    The resurrected Christ appears to us in the flesh in those persons who are arsonists of the heart, who truly make our hears burn within us. The arsonist of the heart invariably looks like someone we know, an ordinary somebody, like the resurrected Christ in his appearances—a gardener, a cook, a stranger. It is interesting to speculate as to why the disciples so often didn’t recognize Christ after the resurrection. After all, he had only been dead for a day and a half when he first appeared. Yet Mary Magdala, who surely knew him well, took him for a gardener. Later, on the road and on the shore, his disciples took him to be a stranger, then a cook. Only in the breaking of the bread did they recognize him as the Christ.
  • Whispering the Lyrics

    Sermon Starter by Leonard Sweet
    in placing the phonograph needle again and again in the grooves of Jimmy Reed's records, we began to notice something curious. If one listened very carefully, there could sometimes be heard, ever so faintly in the background, a soft woman's voice murmuring in advance the next verse of the song. The story that grew up around this -- and perhaps it is true -- was that Jimmy Reed was so absorbed in the bluesy beat and the throbbing guitar riffs of his music that he simply could not remember the words of his own songs. He needed help with the lyrics, and the woman's voice was none other than that of his wife, devotedly coaching her husband through the recording session by whispering the upcoming stanzas into his ear as he sang.

Illustrated Resources from 2010 to 2015

  • Scenes from the Passion of the Christ

    by Neil Bishop
    ("I don't know how many of you are familiar with a series of books called 'Where's Wally?' They show extremely complicated pictures of crowds of people doing lots of different things and the reader's job is to find where Wally is hiding in the picture. He can always be identified by his red and white bobble hat and football scarf, and because he always looks a bit of a Wally...")
  • "Annoying" Holy Spirit?

    by Jim Chern
    ("Pope Francis once said: 'The Holy Spirit annoys us. Because he moves us, he makes us journey, he pushes the Church to go forward. And we are like Peter at the Transfiguration: "Oh, how wonderful it is for us to be here, all together!" But let it not inconvenience us. We would like the Holy Spirit to doze off. We want to subdue the Holy Spirit. And that just will not work...")
  • Our Place Redeemed

    by Kyle Childress
    ("The 2001 novel Up in the Air by Walter Kirn was made into the 2009 movie with George Clooney. It's the story of a businessman named Ryan who lives his life in what's called "Airworld." He's either in airports or in hotels or in the air on a plane and his greatest ambition is to get a million frequent flyer miles. He's from no place in particular, has no commitments...")
  • Easter 6C (2010)

    by Scott Hoezee
    ("As C.S. Lewis once said, we too often substitute religion for God. But that is like substituting navigation for arrival or wooing for marriage. Getting to your destination is wonderful but the trip itself is also valuable. Courtship, dating, the thrill of romance you experience when you are wooing someone to marry you is thrilling, unique, scintillating...")
  • After Boston, Easter

    by Anne Howard
    "The words of this gospel remind me of the young girl Paloma, in the French novel, The Elegance of the Hedgehog. Paloma is keenly intelligent, and also cynical and world-weary. She writes in her Journal of Profound Thoughts that "the world, in its present state, is no place for princesses" and so she's going to end it all on her 13th birthday with a carefully planned, dramatically executed suicide..."
  • Presence in Absence

    by Terrance Klein, SJ
    ("Prescient as genius is, Marcel Proust offers a wonderful example of this in The Guermantes Way. A young man receives a telephone call from his beloved, and somewhat suffocating, Grandmother. 'I spoke, and after a few seconds of silence, suddenly I heard that voice which I mistakenly thought I knew so well; for always until then, every time that my grandmother had talked to me, I had been accustomed to follow what she said on the open score of her face...")
  • Easter 6C (2013)

    by Paul O'Reilly, SJ
    "I once got a Christmas card which I thought said it the best. The picture on the card has a little boy opening his present on Christmas morning. And out of the box, there comes the World. The boy is so enchanted with the wonder of his new toy that he doesn't see that still in the box, there is a little book. And on the front cover of the book it says 'Please look after this world. It is not a toy. Please follow the manufacturer's instructions.'..."
  • Inside the Church and Outside

    by Andrew Prior
    (includes several quotes)
  • God's Resurrecting Power as Ultimate Truth

    by Ron Rolheiser, OMI
    ("As children we believe in fairy tales and nurse the naive idea that there is somewhere a divine magic which can, and will in the end, swish away all evil, injustice, and pain and make a happy ending to everything. The older we get, the harder it is for us to believe that...")
  • The Gift of Shalom

    by Alex Thomas
    ("Jeremy Rifkin in a book called the Emerging Order put forward the belief that the consumer mentality that we have been so influenced by, based on the illusion of infinite supplies of energy and raw materials, could no longer sustain us. He called for a second reformation...")
  • Not as the World Gives

    by Carlos Wilton
    ("Whatever happened to the simple cup of coffee? Now, the person who hands you your cup is a barista — and you've got a lot of choices to make. Regular or espresso, latte or macchiato, mocha or cappuchino: the list goes on. But here's a coffee you won't find in those barista joints. It's called caffè sospeso. Caffè sospeso is translated suspended coffee...")

Illustrated Resources from the Archives

(Was Mother's Day in 2007)
  • The Presence of the Holy Spirit Brings Hope

    by William Oldland
    ("The young boy woke up in the middle of the night. He had a nightmare and he was scared. He got out of bed and headed towards his parents’ room. The house was silent and dark. He became uneasy and scared. When he arrived at their room the bed was empty...")
  • Dictionary or Novel?

    by Mickey Anders
    ("I have in my hands two books - a dictionary and a novel. Which one do you prefer? A dictionary has good words; in fact, it has all the good words. Somebody once defined a dictionary as a book with an excellent vocabulary, but whose plot leaves something to be desired...")
  • You Can Always Tell a Christian

    by Neil Bishop
    ("A few years ago some Christian advertising executives tried to redress the balance. They paid for huge billboards that proclaimed the message, 'Christians make better lovers!' Someone wrote on one of the billboards, 'If Christians do make better lovers, you won't know for sure till you've tried all he others!'...")
  • The Father Will Love Him

    by Phil Bloom
    ("It happened that a missionary priest was visiting his extensive parish, high in the Andes Mountains. The best way to reach certain parts of the parish was by horseback. Once, toward sunset, the priest got disoriented and could not find the way back to his base camp...")
  • Praying for Timothy McVeigh

    by Phil Bloom
    ("Last week, as Timothy McVeigh's scheduled execution drew closer, I had occasion to re-read part of St. Therese's autobiography. She first experienced her 'mission' to pray for souls when she read about a notorious murderer named Henri Pranzini. Like McVeigh, he seemed unrepentant as the day of death neared...")
  • Journey toward Wholeness

    by Fred Buechner
    ("Naya was born in Washington, D.C. two years after the assassination of Abraham Lincoln there and lived well into her nineties. Like everybody else, she had her happy times and her sad times, her weaknesses and her strengths, her good luck and her bad luck, but what makes her so rare in my experience is that, no matter what happened to her, she seemed always to remain remarkably and invincibly herself...")
  • *Peace Comes Dropping Slow

    by Tom Cox
    ("many are the disturbances of life. Being upset, disappointed, jealous, angry or lonely. Feeling a lack of confidence, or a lack of something can make us greedy, possessive, even lustful...")
  • *The Peace from Within

    by Tom Cox
    ("Two painters were once asked to paint a picture illustrating their own idea of rest. The first chose for his scene a quiet, lonely lake, nestled among mountains with a reflected sky. The second, painted a thundering waterfall. Beneath the falls grew a fragile tree, bending over the foam. On its branches, nearly wet with the spray from the falls, was a robin with its nest...")
  • If You Love Me, Show It

    by Gwen Drake
    "Robert Fulghum says this about Mother's Day and the church. 'For 25 years, the second Sunday in May was trouble. Being the minister of a church, I was obliged in some way to address the subject of Mother's Day. It could not be avoided. I tried that..."
  • Loving an Absent Jesus

    by Ernest Munachi Ezeogu, CSSP
    ("In Africa young girls who consecrate themselves to God as nuns dress up as brides for a wedding and sing love songs to Jesus. A few years after such a religious ceremony, a young nun who had been having a rough time in her mission assignment comes back to the convent and asks the Mother Superior: 'Mother, is it really true that we are spouses of Christ.'...")
  • If Anyone Loves Me

    by Richard Fairchild
    "I recall the story of a little girl who, when trains were popular transportation, was taking her first train ride with her parents. As night descended, the mother took the girl, who was clearly quite anxious, and placed her on the upper bunk of the sleeper. She told her little one that up there she would be nearer to God and that God would watch over her..."
  • Not As The World Gives

    by Richard Fairchild
    "One time a Sunday School teacher was talking about the end of time - about Heaven and the Kingdom of God and the New Jerusalem. She told her class of youngsters about the 'crowns of glory' that await people who believe. 'Now tell me,' she said at the close of the lesson, 'Who will get the biggest crown?'..." and other illustrations
  • Peace I Give You

    by Richard Fairchild
    "It seems that one day an artist was commissioned by a wealthy man to paint something that would depict peace. After a great deal of thought, the artist painted a beautiful country scene. There were green fields with cows standing in them, birds were flying in the blue sky and a lovely little village lay in a distant valley..."
  • The Peace of Conquest

    by James Farfaglia
    ("Jerry was the kind of guy we all love to hate. He was always in a good mood and always had something positive to say. When someone would ask him how he was doing, he would reply, 'If I were any better, I would be twins!' He was a unique manager, his career marked by the loyalty of several waiters who had followed him around from restaurant to restaurant...")
  • At Home With Us

    by Vince Gerhardy
    ("Home! What is a home? A home is a place of joy, security, comfort and love. For a child, home is a safe place; it’s the place where they grow and learn; it’s where they are loved and in return give love. Home is the place we like to be; the place we like to come ‘home’ to. It’s our resting place after a hard day. Home is the place where we live...")
  • Peace I Leave with You

    by Vince Gerhardy
    ("A plane landed after a long flight. The flight attendant explained that there was enough time for everyone to get off the aircraft and then reboard in 50 minutes. Everybody got off the plane except one gentleman. The pilot had noticed him as he walked by. He could tell that the man was blind because his guide dog lay quietly underneath the seat next to him...." and another illustration)
  • Imperturability

    by Steve Goodier
    ("I heard of two artists who were asked to illustrate peace. Each was assigned the task of depicting a peaceful scene on canvas. The first artist drew a beautiful picture of a countryside on a warm, spring day...")
  • Easter 6

    by Andrew Greeley
    ("Once upon a time back in the last century there was a young woman from Ireland who had lost her parents and all her family. Some kind people wrote to their relatives in America and said we have this fourteen year old orphan here who is very bright and very pretty and very hard working...")
  • Easter 6 (2004)

    by Andrew Greeley
    ("Once upon a time there was a high school with very serious problems. The students were out of control and over the top. They smoked, they drank, they did drugs and all on the school campus. They hassled teachers, they shouted racial epithets at basketball games, they spread graffiti all over the school walls...")
  • *Not As the World Gives

    by Don Hoffman
    ("Charlie Brown goes for counseling, where the sign says The Doctor Is In. 'I don't know what to do,' he says. 'All of life is frustrating. I love this little redheaded girl, and she doesn't know I'm alive. Every time I try to kick the football, it gets moved...")
  • We Remember

    by Nicholas Lang
    ("Wayne Teasdale, writing in The Mystic Hours says, "The world is divided enough by religions, culture, languages, ethnicities, tribes and nations. Even more profound are divisions between the haves and have nots, the educated and the uneducated, those whose hearts are open and those whose hearts are closed...")
  • The Father Is Still Living in Me

    by Edward Markquart
    ("Chuck Colson had worked for President Nixon years ago; he was in the Nixon administration; and he became a primary part of the Watergate scandal. Now, as a young man, God did not live in Chuck Colson. God didn’t live in Chuck Colson at all...")
  • Just Water

    by David Martyn
    "Back in 1872, just a few years after the American Civil War came to a close, Julia Ward Howe, a poet, suffragist, and social reformer, had a vision. Julia envisioned the establishment of a day to honour mothers — women who understood the cost of war and who attempted to bring the brutality and injustice of armed conflict to an end..."
  • *Easter 6C (2010)

    by Paul O'Reilly, SJ
    ("Two weeks ago, one of my patients died and a couple of days later her son came to see me. She was a lady who lived long enough to see seven great-grandchildren, but her last two years had been a constant struggle with the heart disease which finally killed her. As doctors we had done the best we could to help her, but she was still very restricted by her disease...")
  • The Presence of the Holy Spirit Brings Peace

    by William Oldland
    The young boy woke up in the middle of the night. He had a nightmare and he was scared. He got out of bed and headed towards his parents’ room. The house was silent and dark. He became uneasy and scared. When he arrived at their room the bed was empty. Now, he was frightened and began to cry. He started to call out for them and run through the house. He was still running when he felt hands touch him from behind. For a moment, he felt absolute panic. Then he heard his mother's voice and he broke down in sobs. As she held him tight he told her he was scared because he couldn't find her. He thought he was alone. She told him that they had fallen asleep watching the television while sitting on the couch. They had been near him all along. He had nothing to fear...
  • *The Test of Love

    by Raymond Osborne
    ("The story is told of an aged man who was dying and wanted to see a minister. Having not been a 'regular attendee' in any church, the daughter called the local minister and explained her father’s certain fate. In about thirty minutes the minister arrived at the man’s home. Customarily the minister would read a passage of Scripture with those who were close to death but realized he had left his Bible at the Church...")
  • His Peace Comes From Our Obedience

    by John Pavelko
    ("Dave Dravecky had been asked to speak at a church but he really did not want to do it. He still had not accepted the amputation of his left arm and the end of his major league career. 'I felt lousy that night,' he recalled. But he went anyway..." and other illustrations)
  • Peace I Leave You

    by Gary Roth
    ("There is a story told about Mohatma Ghandi, during a period of unrest between the Hindus and Muslims in India. A Muslim man had killed a Hindu man's son and, in a rage, the Hindu responded by killing the man. After a few weeks he came to see Ghandi, telling him, 'I can find no peace since this thing happened.'...")
  • Finding Tomorrow Today

    by Wiley Stephens
    ("C.S. Lewis described in his own life a very similar experience on the death of his mother as he wrote in the Joyful Christian. 'With my mother's death, all settled happiness, all that was tranquil and reliable disappeared from my life..." and other illustrations)
  • Pass the Peas, Please

    by Billy D. Strayhorn
    ("On a cold winter evening a man suffered a heart attack. After being admitted to the hospital, he asked the nurse to call his daughter. He explained, 'You see, I live alone and she is the only family I have.' The nurse went to phone the daughter. The daughter was quite upset and shouted, 'You mustn't let him die! You see, Dad and I had a terrible argument almost a year ago..." and another illustration)
  • To Be More Intimate

    by Alex Thomas
    ("One of the practices that I have found helpful in developing intimacy with God is what I found in a little book called the God of Surprises by Gerald Hughes. The practice is called A Review of Consciousness that he outlines is done in four steps and only takes fifteen or twenty minutes at the end of each day...")
  • The Gift of Peace

    by Garth Wehrfritz-Hanson
    ("A retired couple was alarmed by the threat of nuclear war so they undertook a serious study of all the inhabited places on the globe. Their goal was to determine where in the world would be the place to be least likely affected by a nuclear war. A place of ultimate security...")
  • Home

    by Garth Wehrfritz-Hanson
    ("A man was trying to read a serious book, but his little boy kept interrupting him. He would lean against his knees and say, 'Daddy, I love you.' The father would give him a pat and say rather absently, 'Yes, Son, I love you too,' and he would kind of give him a little push away so he could keep on reading...")
  • Hugging in the Dark Hallways of Life

    by David Zersen
    ("Of course, some turn such bleak moments into payoffs of a bizarre order. All of us know the Home Alone movies in which McCauley Caulkin turned his character’s uncertainty about the future into resounding victory over burglars who attack his home at Christmas when his parents and family have flown off to Paris, forgetting him-- leaving him behind...")
  • Illustrations

    by Tim Zingale

Other Resources from 2016 to 2018

Other Resources from 2013 to 2015

Other Resources from 2010 to 2012

Other Resources from 2007 to 2009

(Was Mother's Day in 2007)

Other Resources from 2004 to 2006

Other Resources from 2001 to 2003

Other Resources from the Archives

Children's Resources

The Classics

Recursos en Español

Currently Unavailable