Isaiah 35: 1-10

New Resources

  • Proper 18B (2021)

    by Juliana Claassens
  • Exegesis (Isaiah 35:1-10)

    by Richard Niell Donovan
  • Healing Words

    by Laurie Gudim
  • Proper 18B (2021)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Proper 18B (2021)

    by Michael Jackson
  • A Hopeful Word Spoken Out of Place

    by Todd Weir
    Hope is always a word spoken out of place. As the poem “Anyway” says: People are illogical, unreasonable, and self-centered. Love them anyway. If you do good, people will accuse you of selfish, ulterior motives. Do good anyway. If you are successful, you will win false friends and true enemies. Succeed anyway. The good you do today will be forgotten tomorrow. Do good anyway. Honesty and frankness make you vulnerable. Be honest and frank anyway. The biggest men and women with the biggest ideas can be shot down by the smallest men and women with the smallest minds. Think big anyway. People favor underdogs but follow only top dogs. Fight for a few underdogs anyway. What you spend years building may be destroyed overnight. Build anyway. People really need help but may attack you if you do help them. Help people anyway. Give the world the best you have, and you’ll get kicked in the teeth. Give the world the best you have anyway.

Illustrated Resources from the Archives

  • Where God Was Homeless

    by Daniel Clendenin
    ("The sacred baby Jesus enters into our secular world, the extraordinary into the ordinary, the heavenly into the mundane. The British writer G. K. Chesterton captures this divine descent into the human in his poem The House of Christmas...")
  • Sermon Starters (Advent 3A)(2010)

    by Scott Hoezee
    "As Frederick Buechner once noted, happiness pops up pretty much where you would expect it: graduations, weddings, award ceremonies, births. But joy is more unpredictable. Joy can and often is present at also happy occasions but it is just as likely to show up at funerals and in the wake of great national or international tragedies...."
  • The Royal Road

    by Donald Hoffman
    ("Once there was a young pathfinder who gained such a reputation for excellence in her craft that she was called in to see the High King...")
  • Desert Flower: Joy In The Desert

    by John Jewell
    F. Scott Fitzgerald, one of America’s most admired authors in the 1920’s, found himself on the backside of a devastating spiritual desert. By 1936, at the age of 39, his life had been through an emotional shredder. In a remarkable series of articles in Esquire Magazine, he said he realized that his life had been mortgaged to the hilt in a physical and spiritual sense. Poignantly, he described his destitution saying, "In a real dark night of the soul, it is always 3 o’clock in the morning—day after day."...
  • Advent 3A (2001)

    by Linda Kraft
    "A year ago I waited, very impatiently, for a plane to land at Bradley Airport. On board would be my big sister, whom I hadn't set eyes on in 46 years! Shirley was the first child of our father's first family. And I was the first child of his second family born 20 years later. We had grown up in different parts of the country..."
  • Highway to Heaven

    by Jim McCrea
    ("Margaret Tayler Yates was a Navy wife, who was living in the Pearl Harbor area at the time of the Japanese attack in 1941. For more than a year before that, she'd been bed-ridden due to a heart condition....")
  • The Sign of the Crocus

    Art and Faith by Lynn Miller
    The Winter Crocus (Crocus Hyemalis) grows after Israel's long, hot summer. It is among the earliest plants to bloom. The crocus isn't much of a sign as far as volume and height go. The plant is stemless and stands only 1"-3". Its value as a sign (and symbol) is in its ability to withstand the drought of summer and to sprout, sometimes in anticipation of the rain. When you see the crocus you know that the rains are coming. In an arid land, this is indeed a sign...
  • Roads to Joy

    by Keith Wagner
    It was Christmas Eve, and, as usual, George Mason was the last to leave the office. He walked over to a massive safe, spun the dials, swung the heavy door open. Making sure the door would not close behind him, he stepped inside. A square of white cardboard was taped just above the topmost row of strong-boxes. On the card a few words were written. George Mason stared at those words, remembering... Exactly one year ago he had entered this self-same vault. And then, behind his back, slowly, noiselessly the ponderous door swung shut. He was trapped--entombed in the sudden and terrifying dark. He hurled himself at the unyielding door, his hoarse cry sounding like an explosion. Through his mind flashed all the stories he had heard of men found suffocated in time-vaults. No time clock controlled this mechanism; the safe would remain locked until it was opened from the outside. He would have to wait until tomorrow morning. Then the realization hit him. No one would come tomorrow--tomorrow was Christmas...

Resources from Advent 3A, 2019

  • Advent 3A (2019)

    by Joseph Coleson
  • Advent 3A (2019)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Impatient for Redemption

    by Celeste Kennel-Shank
  • The Flowering Desert

    by Anne Le Bas
  • Sermon Starters (Advent 3A)(2019)

    by Stan Mast
    Recently I was lost in the desert of legal paperwork. Applying for a loan to provide for my mother’s long-term care, I encountered one obstacle after another. It was like the carnival game “Whack A Mole.” I would get one contract signed and think, “There, I’m done.” And then a complication would pop up. And another and another. I got to the point of saying, “How can I navigate this trackless waste? I don’t think I can get there from here.” Hope faded and joy was hard to find. But as I began to work on this Sermon Starter, the lovely language of Isaiah 35 focused my mind on those wonderful Advent words, “Your God will come to save you.” And then he did, in the person of a traveling Notary Public, a humble, compassionate, aging Christian who had heard me preach years ago. He showed me the way through the desert. And I am singing for joy. I wouldn’t say that “everlasting joy” has crowned my head, but at least I’ve had another foretaste. For the moment, “sorrow and sighing have fled away.”
  • Pure Gospel

    by Glenn Monson
  • Tears and Laughter

    by Andrew Prior
  • Hoping Beyond Hope

    by David Russell
  • The Hope of Advent

    by Brenda Seat
    Early this year parts of California near Walker Canyon and Lake Elsinore experienced a “super bloom apocalypse,” where long dormant desert flowers in the hot dry desert exploded into bloom after rain and snow melt from the mountains watered the thirsty ground. The bloom was so vibrant and full this year that when satellites in space took pictures you could easily see the areas where the bloom was occurring. But the bloom doesn’t happen every year. The last time was in the spring of 2016 and depending on weather conditions it might not happened again for another 10 years. We have to be patient and notice the signs, when the weather and water conditions are just right, and then we see the miracle of the desert blooming...
  • Advent 3A (2019)

    by Casey Thornburgh Sigmon

Resources from Ordinary 23B/Proper 18B, 2018

Resources from 2013 to 2015

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Resources from 2007 to 2012

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Resources from the Archives

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Children's Resources

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The Classics

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