Psalm 118: 1-2, 19-29

Quick Locator

ReadingsRelated PagesResourcesInformation
Links
138
Categories
10
Last Updated
21 minutes ago
Last Checked
2½ hours ago

New Resources

  • God's Steadfast Love

    by Bob Cornwall
  • Easter Sunday (B)(2021)

    by Jerome Creach
  • Easter Sunday (A)(2020)

    by Scott Daniels
  • Exegesis (Psalm 118)

    by Richard Donovan
  • Sermon Starters (Palm Sunday)(B)(2021)

    by Scott Hoezee
    I have always loved Frederick Buechner’s character sketch of Abraham in his delightful book Peculiar Treasures: A Biblical Who’s Who. Buechner begins by saying that if (in Yiddish) a schlemiel is someone who is always spilling soup onto his tie and a schlemozzle is someone who always get soup spilled onto his tie by others, than Abraham was something of a schlemozzle. He sort of bumped along in life, often having others get the best of him and just doing his level best to figure stuff out across the long journey God commanded him to take (a new journey he had to undertake at the very moment in his long life when rest and retirement, not becoming a wandering nomad, should have been the order of the day). But he lived on the promise: he would have heirs as numerous as stars in the sky, sand on the seashore. At the end of his character sketch, Buechner imagines a very old Abraham at a family reunion picnic. “They weren’t a great nation yet by a long shot, but you’d never know it from the way Abraham sits enthroned there in his velvet yarmulke with several great-grandchildren on his lap and soup on his tie. Even through his thick lenses, you can read the look of faith in his eye… and more than all the kosher meals, the great achievements, and Einsteins and Kissingers, it was THAT look that God loved him for -and had chosen him for in the first place.” And then this: Who knows, Abraham thought to himself, one day they will be talking about my great-great-great . . . grandson, the Savior of the world.
  • The Absentee Landlord

    by Greg Jarrell
  • Easter (B)

    by Howard Wallace

Illustrated Resources from the Archives

  • Lovers’ Walls and Ninny Tombs: All the Kings’ Forces, All the Kings Mend

    by John Auer
    I asked Thisbe (Jeanmarie Simpson!) to help me reflect on this lovers’ wall. Her thoughts go to “The Fantasticks,” the modern musical version (Any-one care to organize a showing of both films sometime this season?) – where it becomes clear that walls are needed, even as we work past them – under them, over them, around them, and through them: “No, leave the wall! Remember, you must always leave the wall.” Jeanmarie relates it to the lyric “Without hurt the heart is hollow.” How do we know we love, how do we know we feel, without pain as well as joy? Without walls we may not know the limits of life -- Neither the risk nor the gain of pushing against and expanding our limits! Of exploring, discovering and daring to go and to follow where it seems none ever has been before. “Deep in December it’s nice to remember the fire of September that made us mellow. Deep in December our hearts will remember and follow . . .” Camus says it takes depth of winter to reveal the invincible summer within us. Remember and follow! Remembering Jesus, as he commands, every time we break bread and share cup together, every time we wash feet, perform acts of love, of justice, of mercy toward another – remembering Jesus is mending walls -- putting things back together that have been torn apart and asunder by violence and death. We do it in our own lives, in our relationships, in our communities, in our world. “All the kings’ forces” would drive us apart, tear us asunder, divide us and conquer us. It is the nature of kings and those who are reckless and heedless with power. Only a suffering nonviolent love can help “all the kings mend” again. There may be walls that break and walls that mend, walls that harm and walls that heal, walls that give death and walls that give life. Remembering Jesus this morning is mending not only the brokenness each of us does, or brokenness done in each of our names -- but also the brokenness each of us is – a “Brokeback Mountain” sort of brokenness -- of love gone far beyond old walls and limits!...
  • Easter Sunday (B)(2015)

    by Doug Bratt
    ("Joy Hollyday tells the story a visiting schoolteacher who worked in a hospital. The teacher of a little boy who was in the hospital asked her to visit him in the hospital in order to help him with his homework. The classroom teacher told the visiting teacher, 'We're studying nouns and adverbs in this young man's class, and I hope you will help him.' When the visiting teacher arrived at the hospital, she was saddened to learn that the child was in the hospital's burn unit in very serious condition...")
  • A Day the Lord Made

    by Rob Elder
    ("When I heard last week that Gene Pitney had died, I felt a little twinge of sadness, I had liked some of his music, especially his ballads. My two college roommates and I exchanged e-mails about his passing last week, one of them remembering a record I bought in our freshman year of Pitney’s greatest hits...")
  • On Rejecting Jesus

    by Larry Patten
    At a ministry conference in the 1980s, I attended a relaxed Q & A with guest speaker Alice Walker of “The Color Purple” fame. As a then young pastor (and longing to be a published author), I asked her how often she’d been rejected in her early career. I can still picture Ms. Walker thoughtfully nodding, and then—gazing at me—saying, “Never.” For a brief, darkish second, I despised her. Why was there always someone who never experienced...Rejection?
  • Preaching Helps (Easter)(B)(2018)

    by Stan Mast
    When Maya Lin created the Vietnam War Memorial Wall, she ran into all kinds of opposition. Key among the critics was the U.S. military. They wanted to put a huge flag behind the Wall flanked by immense statues of soldiers in full battle dress, signifying victory. But she resisted, because she wanted the Wall to be a memorial to the dead. She said, “We have a hard time with defeat and death in the United States. We simply don’t want to face death head on. This wall does that.”...
  • Come On In (Psalm 118)

    Art and Faith by Lynn Miller
    Do you even pay attention when you walk through the door of your church? Do you mark the transition? Or are you focused on the people you need to talk to, the Sunday School lesson you need to review, the youth activities that are happening after worship? Do you walk into the church building thinking, "This is the gate of the Lord"? Do you imagine that you are making a triumphal entry?
  • Unnoticed Stones

    by Ayanna Johnson Watkins
    ("Chuck Smith recounts a popular myth about the building of Solomon’s Temple. The stones used to build it were cut at a different location, he says, and then shipped to the building site. The cornerstone happened to be shipped unmarked, and for a long while, no one knew what the piece was for or where it belonged. Later, the lead builder asked the stone makers when they would send the cornerstone. Of course they’d already sent it, and when the builders went looking for it, they found it in a field—grown over by a jungle of weeds, tossed aside, rejected...")

Other Resources from 2020

  • Easter Sunday (A)(2020)

    by Jason Byassee
  • Easter Sunday (A)(2020)

    by Scott Daniels
  • Easter 2A (2020)

    by Nancy deClaissé-Walford
  • God Remains Faithful

    by Nathan Hall
  • Sermon Starters (Easter Sunday)(A)(2020)

    by Scott Hoezee
    Since I don’t have easy access to my library at Seminary right now, I cannot replicate this in full. But I have always loved Frederick Buechner’s character sketch of Abraham in his delightful book Peculiar Treasures: A Biblical Who’s Who. Buechner begins by saying that if (in Yiddish) a schlemiel is someone who is always spilling soup onto his tie and a schlemozzle is someone who always get soup spilled onto his tie by others, than Abraham was something of a schlemozzle. He sort of bumped along in life, often having others get the best of him and just doing his level best to figure stuff out across the long journey God commanded him to take (a new journey he had to undertake at the very moment in his long life when rest and retirement, not becoming a wandering nomad, should have been the order of the day). But he lived on the promise: he would have heirs as numerous as stars in the sky, sand on the seashore. At the end of his character sketch, Buechner imagines a very old Abraham at a family reunion picnic. “They weren’t a great nation yet by a long shot, but you’d never know it from the way Abraham sits enthroned there in his velvet yarmulke with several great-grandchildren on his lap and soup on his tie. Even through his thick lenses, you can read the look of faith in his eye… and more than all the kosher meals, the great achievements, and Einsteins and Kissingers, it was THAT look that God loved him for -and had chosen him for in the first place.”...
  • Easter (A)

    by Howard Wallace
  • Palm Sunday (ABC)

    by Howard Wallace

Other Resources from 2019

  • Easter Sunday (C)(2019)

    by Jerome Creach
  • Sermon Starter (Easter Sunday)(C)(2019)

    by Scott Hoezee
    They called themselves “Hobbits.” But to many outside their home in The Shire, they were somewhat derisively referred to as “Halflings.” Get it: half of a real person on account of their short stature. Even the short and stout Dwarves were taller than the average Hobbit, not to mention how the world of Men and of Elves towered over these diminutive Hobbits with names like Frodo, Sam, Merri, Pippin. Why, a regular-sized person could pick up the Hobbits like a toddler. “They would appear in your eyes like only a child” someone in Tolkien’s “Lord of the Rings” trilogy once said of the Hobbits. But, of course, it was the race of Hobbits that delivered Middle Earth from the peril of the evil Lord Sauron. And that fact, in turn, leads to the lyric scene near the end of Peter Jackson’s trilogy of films when, at the coronation of the new King Aragorn, the Hobbits come before the newly crowned sovereign only to begin to bow. “My friends,” the King tells them, “You bow to no one.” And then the assembled throng bows down to the four Hobbits, making them appear to stand taller for just a moment than any Man, Dwarf, or Elf in sight. Something about that surprising turn of events reminds me of that rejected stone in Psalm 118.
  • Hosanna!

    by John Holbert
  • Easter 2C (2019)

    by Jonathan Platter

Other Resources from 2016 to 2018

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)

Other Resources from 2013 to 2015

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)

Other Resources from the Archives

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)

Children's Resources and Dramas

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)

Currently Unavailable