Psalm 145: 1-21

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New Resources

  • Proper 12B (2021)

    by Jerome Creach
  • Exegesis (Psalm 145)

    by Richard Donovan
  • Sermon Starters (Proper 12B)(2021)

    by Scott Hoezee
    There is virtually no way to duplicate this in any translation into any language but Psalm 145 is actually an acrostic (hence my earlier comment that despite the RCL’s chopping up of this poem it is overtly designed to be read as a unity). This psalm’s 21 verses correspond to the letters in the Hebrew alphabet with each successive verse beginning with the next letter in the Hebrew alphabet. Verse 1 begins with A, Verse 2 with B, Verse 3 with C, and so on. So in essence Psalm 145 goes from A-Z. At the very least we think that some Hebrew Psalms were composed this way to make them easier to memorize. But there may also be a sense in which this literary structure reflects what is also contained in this poem—and as reflected on above in this sermon starter—and that is the sense that God is being praised here for every reason one could think of from A-Z, the whole kit-n-caboodle, as it were. That structure is pretty interesting on both levels: first, this is to be memorized, to be carried in our hearts as a constant reminder of the nature and character of our God. These are the truths we must live by! But second, God is worthy of praise for the whole kit-n-caboodle of Creation, Salvation, and soon the Re-Creation of all things. Everything God is, everything God has done and continues to do, everything God will do through Christ Jesus the Lord and by the Holy Spirit—all of it from A-Z and beyond is worthy of all praise!
  • What Do You Need?

    by Eleonore Stump

Resources from 2020

  • Proper 13A (2020)

    by Jason Byassee
  • Proper 9A (2020)

    by Jon Gildner
  • Proper 9A (2020)

    by Phil Heinze
  • Sermon Starters (Proper 13A)(2020)

    by Scott Hoezee
    There is virtually no way to duplicate this in any translation into any language but Psalm 145 is actually an acrostic. Its 21 verses correspond to the letters in the Hebrew alphabet with each successive verse beginning with the next letter in the Hebrew alphabet. Verse 1 begins with A, Verse 2 with B, Verse 3 with C, and so on. So in essence Psalm 145 goes from A-Z. At the very least we think that some Hebrew Psalms were composed this way to make them easier to memorize. But there may also be a sense in which this literary structure reflects what is also contained in this poem—and as reflected on above in this sermon starter—and that is the sense that God is being praised here for every reason one could think of from A-Z, the whole kit-n-caboodle, as it were. That structure is pretty interesting on both levels: first, this is to be memorized, to be carried in our hearts as a constant reminder of the nature and character of our God. These are the truths we must live by! But second, God is worthy of praise for the whole kit-n-caboodle of Creation, Salvation, and soon the Re-Creation of all things. Everything God is, everything God has done and continues to do, everything God will do through Christ Jesus the Lord and by the Holy Spirit—all of it from A-Z and beyond is worthy of all praise!
  • Proper 20A (2020)

    by Paul O. Myhre
  • Proper 20A (2020)

    by Tabitha Ssonko
  • Proper 9A (2020)

    by W. Dennis Tucker, Jr.

Resources from 2019

  • Generations (Psalm 145)

    Meditation by Sara Hargreaves
  • I Love to Tell the Story

    Art and Theology by Victoria Jones
    Arabella Katherine Hankey (1834–1911) was a contemporary of Harriet Tubman’s (ca. 1822–1913), but she grew up in a much different context, as the (white) daughter of a wealthy English banker. Her family, though, used their wealth and influence to serve others. Her father, Thomas Hankey, was a leading member of the Clapham Sect, a group of evangelical Anglican social reformers whose avid campaigning, in society and in Parliament, led to the abolition of slavery in the British Empire in 1833. Though the group was waning as Kate was growing up, social justice (alongside personal conversion) remained a key aspect of the gospel her parents taught her, which impelled her to embark on ministry to young female factory workers in London, teaching them the Bible and, I presume, advocating for better working conditions, as her father had a generation earlier. In her early thirties, a serious illness left Kate bedridden for a year. During her convalescence she wrote a long poem in two parts that she called “The Old, Old Story,” which tells the story of redemption, from the Garden of Eden to Jesus Christ’s life, death, and resurrection to the Spirit’s outpouring, in fifty-five quatrains. “I Love to Tell the Story,” as well as her other famous hymn, “Tell Me the Old, Old, Story,” are derived from this longer work...
  • Basking in God

    by Kate Matthews
  • Proper 27C (2019)

    by Lori Niles
    There is something in this psalm that seems to parallel a poem familiar to several generations. You may recognize it as the opening entry of the book, “Where the Sidewalk Ends” by Shel Silverstein. If you are a dreamer, come in, If you are a dreamer, a wisher, a liar, A hope-er, a pray-er, a magic bean buyer, If you’re a pretender, come sit by my fire… Come in! Come in! It may seem odd to invite liars and pretenders along with hope-ers and pray-ers, and yet in many ways, this psalm does exactly that...

Resources from 2015 to 2018

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Resources from 2011 to 2014

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Resources from the Archives

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Children's Resources

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The Classics

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