Psalm 29: 1-11

New Resources

  • Exegesis (Psalm 29)

    by Richard Donovan
  • Sermon Starters (Baptism of the Lord)(B)(2021)

    by Scott Hoezee
    Thunderstorms. incredible meteorological phenomena. Even as you read this sermon starter, there are likely upwards of 2,000 thunderstorms going on across the earth. On average, each day 45,000 such storms occur. They are among the most powerful forces we know. In the simplest sense, but also in perhaps the most boring sense, a thunderstorm is little more than an atmosphere stabilizer. Acting like a giant heat machine, a thunderstorm forms when there is a lot of cold air sitting on top of a lot of warm air. In order to re-balance the atmosphere, a thunderstorm pumps the warm air upward and the cold air downward until the atmosphere evens out. Once that happens, the thunderstorm has achieved its stabilizing purpose and it dies out. In that sense thunderstorms exist only to destroy themselves. But along the way these storms can and do produce some of this planet’s most stunning marvels because that shifting around of cold and warm air can produce incredible winds. Here and there an outflow produces a microburst that can puff down toward the ground at 100 mph–we’ve all seen those grim pictures of what such wind shear can do to airplanes. In addition to wind, thunderstorms also produce rain and even ice. The storm’s strong currents can supercool water particles to well below freezing, and if enough of this ice builds up, it falls to the ground as hail–though usually no larger than pebbles, some strong storms have produced so much ice that it falls in chunks as large as a grapefruit. But there’s more: the forces within thunderstorm clouds are so great that particles of energy smash into one another with enough wallop to exchange electrical charges. So some particles get stripped of electrons while others add electrons, thus producing both positively charged particles and negatively charged particles. Typically the positive particles zoom to the top of the cloud and the negative ones sink to the bottom, creating a high-voltage chasm that equalizes itself through a fiery flash of lightning. Lasting only 30 microseconds, a bolt of lightning peaks out at 1,000,000,000,000 watts (one trillion) with a surface temperature of 20,000 degrees centigrade: that is three times hotter than the surface of the sun!
  • Sermon Starters (Trinity Sunday)(B)(2021)

    by Scott Hoezee
    Thunderstorms are an incredible meteorological phenomena. Even as you read this sermon starter, there are likely upwards of 2,000 thunderstorms going on across the earth. On average, each day 45,000 such storms occur. They are among the most powerful forces we know. In the simplest sense, but also in perhaps the most boring sense, a thunderstorm is little more than an atmosphere stabilizer. Acting like a giant heat machine, a thunderstorm forms when there is a lot of cold air sitting on top of a lot of warm air. In order to re-balance the atmosphere, a thunderstorm pumps the warm air upward and the cold air downward until the atmosphere evens out. Once that happens, the thunderstorm has achieved its stabilizing purpose and it dies out. In that sense thunderstorms exist only to destroy themselves. But along the way these storms can and do produce some of this planet’s most stunning marvels because that shifting around of cold and warm air can produce incredible winds...
  • Trinity Sunday (B)(2021)

    by J. Clinton McCann
  • Baptism of Jesus (C)(2019)

    by Danny Quanstrom
  • Trinity Sunday (B)(2021)

    by Kelvin St. John
  • Wonder at the Center

    by Leslie Scoopmire
  • Trinity (B)

    by Howard Wallace

Resources from 2019 and 2020

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)

Resources from 2017 and 2018

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)
  • God of the Storm

    by Kat Banakis
  • Trinity Sunday (B)(2018)

    by Rhonda Carrim
  • The Voice of God

    by Bob Cornwall
  • Baptism of Our Lord (A)(2017)

    by Nancy deClaisse-Walford
  • Baptism of Jesus (A)(2017)

    by Stan Mast
    Anyone who has seen the movie, “Bruce Almighty,” remembers Jim Carry playing an ordinary doofus who is given almighty power by God, who is played by Morgan Freeman. That casting choice led a movie reviewer for the New York Times to reflect on the way Hollywood movies have portrayed God. God, said the Times, is always either a “hairy thunderer or a cosmic muffin.” God is either a threat way up there or a soft comfortable kind of joke right down here.
  • Preaching Helps (Epiphany 1B)(2018)

    by Stan Mast
    In the classic film, “Forest Gump,” Lt. Dan Taylor is a Vietnam veteran who has lost both legs in battle. He wanted to die on the battlefield, but Forest saved his life, a good deed that made Lt. Dan furious. After a long separation, Lt. Dan shows up at Forest’s shrimp boat and offers to become first mate. Out to sea they go with Lt. Dan still furious. In one scene he is perched on the highest part of the boat, screaming at God, daring God to come and get him. As we see the horizon getting darker and darker, Forest says, “Just then, God showed up.” It was Hurricane Carmen. Lt. Dan was never the same after meeting God in that storm.
  • Preaching Helps (Trinity)(B)(2018)

    by Stan Mast
    I want to suggest an unusual, but hopefully helpful way of reading the last two verses of this Psalm. Years ago I taught courses on narrative preaching, using the books by Eugene Lowry, especially The Homiletical Plot. Lowry urges preachers to organize their sermons using a narrative plot. He used five exclamations to summarize that plot: Oops, Ugh, Aha, Whee, and Yeah. The “Oops” is the introduction of trouble that puts people off balance. The “Ugh” is the deepening of the trouble, where life gets messier and messier because of sin. The “Aha” is the turning point in the sermon, the introduction of grace into the trouble, the place where grace breaks into the story of human misery. The “Aha” should be followed by the “Whee,” in which salvation is explained and the grace of God celebrated. Finally, the sermon should end with a “Yeah,” which shows how life is different, now that God has come in his grace. As a result of grace, here’s how life is changed. We can settle into the experience of salvation with a satisfied “Yeah.”...
  • Trinity Sunday (B)(2018)

    by J. Clinton McCann

Resources from 2013 to 2016

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)

Resources from the Archives

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)

Children's Resources

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)

The Classics

(In order to avoid losing your place on this page when viewing a different link, I would suggest that you right click on that link with your mouse and select “open in a new tabâ€. Then, when you have finished reading that link, close the tab and you will return to where you left off on this page. FWIW!)